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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q4v p248]

Reverence estre requise en Mariage.

Quand le serpent veult froyer au poisson,
Il met tout hors son venin, & poison,
Puys en sifflant la muraine il appelle:[1]
Incontinent vers son masle vient elle.
Ainsi doibt estre en un lict nuptial
Honneur des deux, tresreverential.

A l’exemple du prudent serpent, qui devant que froyer avec la
muraine (soit lamproie, ou autre") vomit & laisse son ve-
nin, & icelle à son appel sifflant, obeyt, & vient vers luy: Ain-
si les gens mariéz se doivent assembler en Amour, & reve
rence l’ung de l’autre, toute male affection, & courroux
jecté hors du coeur, & despoillé quant & quant les habitz.

Notes:

1.  For the mating of the viper with the moray eel, see Pliny, Natural History 9.39.76; Aelian, De natura animalium 1.50; 9.66. The viper spits out the poison in order to be gentle and safe for the union.


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Section: MATRIMONIUM (Marriage). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N8r p207]

In foecunditatem sibi ipsi
damnosam.

Fruitfulness bringing its own destruction

Ludibrium pueris lapides iacientibus, hoc me
In trivio posuit rustica cura nucem.
Quae laceris ramis perstrictoque ardua libro,
Certatim fundis per latus omne petor.
Quid sterili posset contingere turpius? eheu,
Infelix: fructus in mea damna fero.[1]

A countryman’s care placed me, a nut tree, at this cross-roads, where I am the butt of stone-throwing boys. I have grown tall, but my branches are broken, my bark bruised, I am attacked with sling-stones, competing on every side. What worse fate could befall a barren tree? Alas, cursed tree that I am, I bear fruit to my own destruction.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.3, see also Aesop, Fables 152.


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