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Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R1v p258]

Le Chesne.[1]

L’arbre à Jova qui tout garde, & maintient.
Chappeau de Chesne au gardeur appartient.[2]

Coronne Civique de Chesne estoit baillée par honneur
à celuy, qui avoit gardé, & sauvé un citoyen de mort.
Car le Chesne est consacré à Jupiter, ou Jova (qui
est Dieu) lequel tout garde, & entretient.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R2r p259]

AULTRE.

Le Chesne sert premier de gland,[3] puis d’ombre,
De Jupiter l’arbre ha des biens sans nombre.

Avant les bledz trouvéz, Les anciens vivoyent
de gland de Chesne, & puis se reposoyent des-
soubz en l’ombrage, & pource consacroyent le
Chesne au souverain Dieu Juppiter, qui leur don
noit d’enhaut nourriture, & repos. Ce que signifie
la beneficence de Dieu estre telle, que apres le
fruict d’icelle receu, encore en sert l’ombre, &
memoire, comme faict la loy de Moyse, & les
Prophetes, a l’Evangile.

Notes:

1.  The woodcut here is a fairly close, laterally inverted, copy of that used in the 1549 French edition.

2.  ‘a crown of oak’, awarded for saving the life of a fellow-soldier; see Pliny, Natural History, 16.3.7.

3.  For the ancient belief that early man fed on acorns see e.g. Lucretius, De Rerum natura, 5.939; Vergil, Georgics, 1.7; Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.106.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I3v f54v]

EMBLEMA LXXXII.

Nupta contagioso.

A woman married to a diseased man

Dii meliora piis,[1] Mezenti. Cur age sic me
Compellas?[2] Emptus quod tibi dote gener,
Gallica quem scabies[3] dira & mentagra perurit
Hoc est quidnam aliud, dic mihi saeve pater.
Corpora corporibus, quum iungere mortua vivis,
Efferaque Hetrusci facta novare ducis?[4]

O Mezentius, God grant a better fate to the dutiful! - Now why do you address me by that name? - Because with a dowry you have purchased a son-in-law seared by the Gallic scab and the dreaded sore on the face. What else is this - o tell me, cruel father - but to join corpses to living bodies and repeat the savage deeds of the Etruscan leader?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I4r f55r]

Das LXXXII.

Eins Frantzösichen Braut.

Gott bhüt der frommen Menschen Hertz
O Mezentz was treibst für ein schertz?
Das du mich also nötst und zwingst
Und ein Eiden dir mit gelt bringst
Den die Frantzossn Bocken und kretzt
An allen Gliedern hondt verletzt?
Ach herter Vatter sag mir doch
Was ist es das aber anderß noch
Dann zusammen legen zu gleich
Lebendig Leut und todten Leich
Und erneuwern die greuwlich that
Deß Hetruscischen Fürsten spat.

Notes:

1.  Vergil, Georgics, 3.513.

2.  sic me compellas, ‘address me by that name’, i.e. Mezentius. This is explained below, note 4.

3.  Gallica...scabies, ‘the Gallic scab’: Osseous lesions caused by syphilis, which was epidemic in Europe following Charles VIII’s first Italian war. Spreading to the French army following its occupation of Naples (February 1495), it became known to the French as “the Neapolitan sickness”, to the Italians as “the French sickness.” It acquired its modern name from a mythological Latin poem on the subject by Girolamo Fracastoro, “Syphilis sive morbus gallicus”, a popular favourite first published in 1530. Fracastoro later used the name Syphilus (a mythical shepherd) when he contributed to the scientific literature on the disease (Liber I de sympathia et antipathia rerum, de contagione et contagiosis morbis, 1550). Note that here the French uses ‘un villain Podagre’ instead, which Cotgrave lists as the gout. Of the two corresponding emblems with this one, the 1549 edition uses verolle (pox), and 1615 uses podagre in the title and verolle in the verse.

4.  See Vergil, Aeneid, 8.483-88, for the crimes of Mezentius, the Etruscan king who opposed Aeneas on his arrival in Italy. He inflicted a dreadful fate on his victims by tying them face to face with a corpse and leaving them to die.


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