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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[D3r f14r]

EMBLEMA XIX.

Facundia difficilis.

Eloquence is hard

Antidotum Aeaeae medicata in pocula Circes,
Mercurium hoc Ithaco fama dedisse fuit.[1]
Moly vocant, id vix radice evellitur atra,
Purpureus sed flos, lactis & instar habet.
Eloquii candor facundiaque allicit omnes:
Sed multi res est tanta laboris opus.

According to the story, Mercury gave to the man from Ithaca this antidote to the poisoned cup of Aeaean Circe. They call it moly. It is hard to pull up by its black root. The plant is dark, but its flower is white as milk. The brilliance of eloquence and readiness of speech attracts all men, but this mighty thing is a work of much labour.

Das XIX.

Wolberedt ist schwer.

Ulyssi als die sage was
Soll Mercurius geben das
Wider der Circe buler trenck
Di▀ gegen Artzney zu eim gschenck
Ein kraut so wirt Moly genannt
Mit einr schwartzen Wurtzel bekannt
Die man schwerlich au▀ dem grundt reist
Darauff ein purpurfarb Blumb gleist
Ist innwendig wie die Milch wei▀
Also wol reden behelt den prei▀
Und reitzet jederman zu ir
Aber es braucht vil mŘh und gir.

Notes:

1. áSee Homer, Odyssey, 10.270ff. for the story of the encounter of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) and his crew with the sorceress Circe on the island of Aeaea. The plant moly is described ibid, 302-6. See Emblem 85 ([A67a085]), for the effect of Circe’s poisoned cup. Cf. Erasmus, De Copia (Loeb edition, 1.91 D), where moly is interpreted as wisdom rather than eloquence. Cf. Coustau, ‘In herbam Moly, ex Homero’ ([FCPb073]).


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    Section: SCIENTIA (Learning). View all emblems in this section.

    Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[N1v p194]

    Eloquentia Fortitudine prae-
    stantior.[1]

    Eloquence superior to strength

    Arcum laeva tenet. rigidam fert dextera clavam,
    Contegit & Nemees corpora nuda leo.
    Herculis haec igitur facies. non convenit illud
    Qu˛d vetus & senio tempora cana gerit.
    Quid qu˛d lingua illi levibus traiecta cathenis,
    Queis fissa facileis allicit aure viros?
    An’ne qu˛d Alciden lingua non robore Galli
    Praestantem, populis iura dedisse ferunt?
    Cedunt arma togae,[2] & quamvis durissima corda
    Eloquio pollens ad sua vota trahit.

    His left hand holds a bow, his right hand a stout club, the lion of Nemea clothes his bare body. So this is a figure of Hercules. But he is old and his temples grizzled with age - that does not fit. What of the fact that his tongue has light chains passing through it, which are attached to men’s pierced ears, and by them he draws them unresisting along? The reason is surely that the Gauls say that Alceus’ descendant excelled in eloquence rather than might and gave laws to the nations. - Weapons yield to the arts of peace, and even the hardest of hearts the skilled speaker can lead where he will.

    Notes:

    1. áThis epigram is closely based on Lucian’s essay, The Gallic Hercules.

    2. áCf. Cicero’s notorious line, Cedant arma togae, concedat laurea linguae, ‘Let weapons yield to the arts of peace, let laurels yield to eloquence’ (quoted in Quintilian, Institutio oratoria 11.1.24).


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    • extinct, 'historical' peoples (with NAME) [32B2(GAULS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • 'litterae', symbolic representations, allegories and emblems ~ literature; 'Lettere' (Ripa) [48C90] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Power of Eloquence; 'Forza sottoposta all'Eloquenza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52D31(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generositÓ dell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virt¨ del animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) [54A7] Search | Browse Iconclass

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