Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D7v f18v]

EMBLEMA XXVI.

Concordia insuperabilis.

Concord is insuperable

Tergeminos inter fuerat concordia fratres,
Tanta simul pietas mutua, & unus amor.
Invicti humanis ut viribus ampla tenerent
Regna, uno dicti nomine Geryonis.[1]

There was concord between triplet brothers, such mutual care, one love between them all; and so, unconquerable by human force, they held wide realms and were called by the one name of Geryones.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [D8r f19r]

Das XXVI.

Einigkeit ist unuberwindtlich.

Die Brder so drey Zwilling
Lebten mit einander eining
Ir [=In] solcher lieb, gunst und freundtschafft
Sie gegn einander warn verhafft
Das sie regierten also zgleich
Ohn widerstandt ir eigen Reich
Wurden auch nur mit eim namen gnennt
Geryon, dabey man sie kennt.

Notes:

1. This is a rationalisation of Geryones, the unconquerable giant with three heads or three bodies, who dwelt on the island Erytheia of the mythic Hesperides, eventually vanquished and killed by Hercules during his abduction of Geryones’ famous cattle. See Emblem 17 ([A67a017]).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [A5r p9]

Gratiam referendam.

Show gratitude.

Ario insignis pietate Ciconia nido
Investes pullos pignora grata fovet,
Taliaque expectat sibi munera mutua reddi,
Auxilio hoc quoties mater egebit anus:
Nec pia spem soboles fallit, sed fessa parentum
Corpora fert humeris, praestat & ore cibos.[1]

The stork, famed for its dutiful care, in its airy nest cherishes its featherless chicks, its dear pledges of love. The mother bird expects that the same kind of service will be shown her in return, whenever she needs such help in her old age. Nor does the dutiful brood disappoint this hope, but bears its parents’ weary bodies on its wings and offers food with its beak.

Notes:

1. See Pliny, Natural History 10.32.63: cranes care for their parents’ old age in their turn. See also Aelian, De natura animalium 3.23.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions