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EMBLEMA LXXV.

Custodiendas virgines.

Girls must be guarded

Vera haec effigies[1] innuptae est Palladis: eius
Hic Draco, qui dominae constitit ante pedes.
Cur divae comes hoc animal? Custodia rerum,
Huic data: sic lucos, sacraque templa colit.[2]
Innuptas opus est cura asservare puellas
Pervigili, laqueos undique tendit amor.[3]

This is the true image of virgin Pallas. Her snake is here, positioned at his mistress’s feet. Why does this creature accompany the goddess? The task of guarding things was entrusted to it, and so it looks after groves and sacred temples. It is necessary to guard unmarried girls with ever-watchful care - Love lays his snares on every side.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H8r f51r]

Das LXXV.

Jungfrauwen sol man bewaren.

Diß ist das Bild abconterfeyt
Der Göttin Pallas ongefreyt
Diß ist der Drach so allzeit stat
Vor seiner Frauwen Füsse trat
Warumb wirt dieses Thier gegebn
Der Göttin zu eim gferten ebn?
Diß Göttin ist ubers gut gsetzt
Also bewohnts Kirchn und dWeld stets
Mit grossem fleiß und stäter hut
Mann hüten sol der Meidlin gut
So noch seind Jungfrauwen ungefreit
Dann die Lieb legt in strick allzeit.

Notes:

1.  ‘Image of virgin Pallas’. Pallas Athene, virgin goddess and protectress of the city of Athens, represented with helmet, spear and aegis. Pallas Athene was equated with Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom. Pausanias, Periegesis 1.24.7 mentions such a statue with a snake.

2.  See Macrobius, Saturnalia 1.20.3: ‘the snake with its keen and ever-watchful sight has assigned to it the custodianship of temples, shrines, oracles and treasures.’ Ancient Greek holy sites often housed a snake.

3.  ‘Love lays his snares on every side’ - a proverbial saying.


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In Iuventam

On youth

II.

Natus uterque Iovis tener, atque imberbis uterque,
Quem Latona tulit, quem tulit & Semele. [1]
Salvete, aeterna simul & florete iuventa,
Numine sit vestro quae diuturna mihi.
Tu vino curas, tu victu dilue morbos,
Ut lento accedat sera senecta pede.

Sons of Jove, each of you, each of you tender and beardless, one born of Latona, one of Semele, hail! Be glorious together in your everlasting youth, and may youth by your divine assent last long for me. You wash away my cares with wine, and you dissolve my bodily ills with [disciplined] living, that old age may approach late and with slow footsteps.

Notes:

1.  Apollo (son of Latona) and Dionysus (son of Semele), gods of healing and of wine. Beautiful and ever young, they were often linked, e.g. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.421; 4.18; Epistulae (Heroides), 1.14.31. For Dionysus (Bacchus), see Emblem 67 ([A56a067]).


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