Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I1r f52r]

EMBLEMA LXXVII

Pudicitia.

Chastity

Porphirio domini si incaestet in aedibus uxor
Despondetque animum, praeque dolore perit.
Abdita in arcanis naturae est causa, sit index
Syncerae haec volucris certa pudicitiae.[1]

If the wife in its master’s house is unfaithful, the moorhen despairs and dies of grief. The reason lies hidden in the secrets of nature. This bird may serve as a sure sign of untarnished chastity.

Das LXXVII.

Keuschheit.

So die Frauw im hauß ir Ehr bricht
Daß ir Mann nicht weist und nicht sicht
Der purpur Vogel also schnell
Vor leid er vergeth und stirbt grell
Die ursach aber ist allein
Verborgen in der Natur gheim
Dieser Vogel ein gewiß zeichen geit
Der rein unbefleckten keuschheit.

Notes:

1.  For this information about the porphyrio (purple gallinule, a kind of moorhen) see Aelian, De Natura animalium, 3.42; Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae, 9,388C: the purple gallinule ... when it is domesticated, ... keeps a sharp eye on married women and is so affected if the wife commits adultery, that it ends its life by strangling and so gives warning to its master.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

    Relating to the text:

    Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

    Single Emblem View

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [m7r p189]

    In Iuventam

    On youth

    II.

    Natus uterque Iovis tener, atque imberbis uterque,
    Quem Latona tulit, quem tulit & Semele. [1]
    Salvete, aeterna simul & florete iuventa,
    Numine sit vestro quae diuturna mihi.
    Tu vino curas, tu victu dilue morbos,
    Ut lento accedat sera senecta pede.

    Sons of Jove, each of you, each of you tender and beardless, one born of Latona, one of Semele, hail! Be glorious together in your everlasting youth, and may youth by your divine assent last long for me. You wash away my cares with wine, and you dissolve my bodily ills with [disciplined] living, that old age may approach late and with slow footsteps.

    Notes:

    1.  Apollo (son of Latona) and Dionysus (son of Semele), gods of healing and of wine. Beautiful and ever young, they were often linked, e.g. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.421; 4.18; Epistulae (Heroides), 1.14.31. For Dionysus (Bacchus), see Emblem 67 ([A56a067]).


    Related Emblems

    Show related emblems Show related emblems

    Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


    Iconclass Keywords

    Relating to the image:

      Relating to the text:

      Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

       

      Back to top

      Privacy notice
      Terms and conditions