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EMBLEMA C.

In studiosum captum amore.

A scholar in the toils of love

Immersus studiis, dicundo & iure peritus,
Et maximus libellio,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K7r f66r] Helianiran[1] amat, quantum nec Thracius unquam
Princeps sororis pellicem.[2]
Pallada cur alio superasti iudice Cypri?
Num sat sub Ida est vincere?[3]

This man immersed in learning, this expert in expounding the law, this great bookman, loves Helianira more passionately than the Thracian king ever desired the woman whom he took in her sister’s place. - Cyprian goddess, why have you defeated Pallas again with another man as judge? Isn’t it enough to have conquered on the slopes of Ida?

Das C.

Von einem Studenten so in lieb verhafft.

Ein Student im Rechten gelehrt
Wolberedt und ein Schreiber wehrt
Der liebt Helianiran mehr
Dann die Semelen Juppiter
Venus warumb hastu Pallas
Widr uberwundn, das vorg nit gnug was?

Notes:

1.  In some other versions ‘Heliodora’; cf. a poem written to her by Philodemus in Anthologia graeca 5.155.

2.  ‘the Thracian king’, a reference to the story of Tereus who lusted after his wife’s sister. See Emblem 176 ([A67a176]) notes.

3.  sub Ida, ‘on the slopes of Ida’, a reference to the ‘judgement of Paris’, when Paris, a shepherd on Mount Ida in Asia Minor, was chosen to arbitrate in a contest of beauty and awarded the ‘apple of beauty’ or ‘discord’ to Venus (the Cyprian goddess), who thus defeated the other two contenders, Hera (the queen of the gods) and Pallas Athene (goddess of learning).


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EMBLEMA XCIX.

Potentissimus affectus amor.

Love, the all-powerful emotion

Aspice ut invictus vires auriga leonis,
Expressus gemma pusio vincat amor.
Utque manu hac scuticam tenet, hac ut flectit habenas,
Utque est in pueri plurimus ore decor.
Dira lues procul esto: feram qui vincere talem
Est potis, à nobis temperet anne manus? [1]

Look - here’s Love the lad, carved on a gem. He rides triumphant in his chariot and subdues the lion’s might. In one hand he holds a lash, with the other he guides the reins, and on his countenance rests the loveliness of youth. - Dread pestilence keep far away. Would one who has the power to conquer such a beast keep his hands from us?

Das XCIX.

Die Lieb ist das sterckst Bandt.

Schauw an wie in dem Edlen Gstein
Wol abgebild der Furmann klein
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [K6v f65v] Ist dlieb so uberwindt ungmacht
Der wilden Löwen sterck und macht
Und wie mit einer hand er führt
Die Geisel mit der andr regiert
Den Zaum und mit all seinr gestalt
Ein lustig und lieblich zier halt
Diß greuwlich seucht sey weit von uns
Dann so er mechtig ist all sunst
Zu uberwinden solche Thier
Meinst daß wir seyen frey darfür?

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.221, an epigram about a seal carved with a representation of Eros driving a chariot drawn by lions.


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