Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L3r f70r]

EMBLEMA CVI.

Quae supra nos, nihil ad nos.[1]

What lies above us is none of our business

Caucasia aeternum pendens in rupe Prometheus[2]
Diripitur sacri praepetis ungue iecur.
Et nollet fecisse hominem, figulosque perosus
Accensam rapto damnat ab igne facem.
Roduntur variis prudentum pectora curis,
Qui coeli affectant scire, deûmque vices.

Suspended for ever from the Caucasian rock, Prometheus has his liver torn by the talons of the sacred bird. He could well wish he had not made man. Hating moulders of clay, he curses the torch lit from the stolen fire. - The hearts of the learned are gnawed by various cares, the learned who strive to know the vicissitudes of heaven and the gods.

Das CVI.

Was uber uns ist geht uns nicht an.

Auff dem hohen Berg Caucaso
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L3v f70v]Ligt angeschmidt Prometheus do
Dem zerreist und frist die Leber
On underlaß der schnell Adler
Der wölt jetzt daß er gemacht hett nie
Kein Bild und wer müssig gweßn je
Hett auch das Feuwr nie gerürt an
Hetts oben im Himmel lon stahn
Der Klugen Hertzen so da wölln
Ins Himmels lauff seyn Gotts Geselln
Werden mit vil angst sorg und müh
Teglich on underlaß gplagt hie.

Notes:

1.  See Erasmus, Adagia 569, Quae supra nos nihil ad nos.

2.  The Titan Prometheus appears in myth as the champion of men against the ill-will of Zeus. According to one account, he moulded man out of clay (hence the reference to figuli, lit. ‘potters’, in l.3). Again, when Zeus withheld fire from mortals, Prometheus ascended to heaven and stole fire from the chariot of the sun for the benefit of men. As a perpetual punishment, Prometheus was put in chains and suspended from a rock in the Caucasus, where an eagle, the sacred bird of Zeus, in the day-time consumed his liver, which renewed itself every night. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 1.82ff; Hesiod, Theogony 561ff.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

  • (symbolic) representations ~ creation, cosmos, cosmogony, universe, and life (in the broadest sense) [10] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • fire (one of the four elements) [21C] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Things Unknown, the Unknown (+ emblematical representation of concept) [51AA8(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Curiosity, Inquisitiveness, Desire of Knowledge; 'Curiosità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52A12(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Punishment; 'Castigo', 'Pena', 'Punitione' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57BB13(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(CAUCASUS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Prometheus makes man out of clay, usually Minerva present [91E451] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Prometheus steals fire from the chariot of the sun [91E4521] Search | Browse Iconclass

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L1r f68r]

EMBLEMA CIIII.

ἀντέρως, id est, amor virtutis. GREEK

Anteros, that is, love of virtue

Διαλογιστικῶς

In dialogue form.

Dic ubi sunt incurvi arcus? ubi tela Cupido?
Mollia queis iuvenum figere corda soles?[1]
Fax ubi tristis? ubi pennae? tres unde corollas
Fert manus? unde aliam tempora cincta gerunt?
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L1v f68v] Haud mihi vulgari est, (hospes) cum Cypride quicquam
Ulla voluptatis nos neque forma tulit,
Sed pueris [=puris] hominum succendo mentibus ignes
Disciplinae: animos astraque ad alta traho.
Quatuor aequè ipsa texo virtute corollas,[2]
Quare [=Quarum] quae Sophiae est, tempora prima tegit.

Tell me, where are your arching bows, where your arrows, Cupid, the shafts which you use to pierce the tender hearts of the young? Where is your hurtful torch, where your wings? Why does your hand hold three garlands? Why do your temples wear a fourth? - Stranger, I have nothing to do with common Venus, nor did any pleasurable shape bring me forth. I light the fires of learning in the pure minds of men and draw their thoughts to the stars on high. I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self and the chief of these, the garland of Wisdom, wreathes my temples.

Das CIIII.

Wider Lieb, das ist der Tugend lieb.

Lieber Cupido sag mir frey
Wo doch dein krummer bogen sey?
Und deine Pfeil damit du rürst
Und der weichen Jüngling Hertz bürst?
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L2r f69r] Wo ist dein wütend und brinnend Flamm
Wo seind dein Fettich wundersam
Woher bringst die drey Krentz am Arm
Darzu den umb deine Schläff warm?
Ich hab weder gmein theil noch ichts
Lieber freundt mit Frauw Venus zicht
Es ist auch ein groß underscheid
An der form, gstalt der wollust beid:
Ich entzünd in der Menschen Hertz
Die reine brunst der Zucht on schertz
Und für deß Menschen mut und sinn
Ubersich in die Wolcken hin
Und flicht auß den tugenden schon
Vier Krentzlein zierlich das thut stohn
Zu oberst auff dem Haupt, das gehört
Und sol seyn der Weißheit ongwert.

Notes:

1.  This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 16.201.

2.  ‘I weave four garlands out of virtue’s self’, a reference to the four cardinal virtues, justice, temperance, courage and wisdom.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top