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EMBLEMA CXV.

In victoriam dolo partam.

On victory won by guile.

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Aiacis tumulum lachrymis ego perluo virtus,
Heu misera albentes dilacerata comas.
Scilicet hoc restabat adhuc, ut iudice Graeco[1]
Vincerer: & causa stet potiore dolus.[2]

I, Virtue, bedew with tears the tomb of Ajax, tearing, alas, in my grief my whitening hairs. This was all it needed - that I should be worsted with a Greek as judge, and that guile should appear to have the better cause.

Das CXV.

Von Sig durch betrug bekommen.

Ich die Tugend mit zehern naß
Wasch deß Helden Ajacis Graß,[3]
Allda er dann begraben ligt
Und rauff auß mein schönes Har dick
Dann das allein noch ubrig war
Das ich beym Griechischen Richter zwar
Das Recht gewesn, aber es gilt
Mehr dann das recht der betrug milt.

Notes:

1.  The Greek assembly awarded the arms of the dead Achilles to the cunning and eloquent Ulysses, not the brave and straight-forward Ajax. For Ajax’s subsequent suicide, see Emblem 66 [A67a066].

2.  See Anthologia graeca 7.145.

3.  While ‘Gras’ (Engl.: grass) is a possible reading, ‘Grab’ (Engl.: grave), although it disturbs the rhyme, is more likely: an interesting confusion between ‘b’ and the German ‘ß’.


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EMBLEMA CXIX.

Opulentia tyranni, paupertas sub-
iectorum.

A wealthy ruler means poor subjects

Humani quod splen est corporis, in populi re
Hoc Caesar[1] fiscum dixerat esse suum.
Splene aucto, reliqui tabescunt corporis artus,
Fisco aucto, arguitur civica pauperies.

It was a saying of Caesar that the imperial treasury has the same relation to the people as the spleen has to the human body: if the spleen is enlarged, all the other members of the body waste away. A swollen treasury is proof of poverty among the citizens.

Das CXIX.

Reich Herrn, arm Underthanen.

Das ins Menschen Leib sMiltz ist diß
In den Regimenten ist gwiß
Der Oberkeit Schatzkammer schwer
Wie gsprochen hat der Keyser
So sich das Miltz mehrt nemmen ab
All ander Glieder biß ins Grab
So sich mehrt der Schatz in der Rennt
Würd der Bürger armut erkennt.

Notes:

1.  The Emperor Trajan (as clarified in the commentary), one of the five ‘Good Emperors’. See Aurelius Victor, Epitome de Caesaribus, 42.21; Erasmus, Apophthegmata, 8.


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