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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M4v f79v]

EMBLEMA CXXII.

In eum qui truculentia suorum perierit.

On one who perished through the savagery of his own people.

PROSOPOPEIA

Things given speech.

Delphinem invitum me in littora compulit aestus,
Exemplum infido quanta pericla mari.
Nam si nec propriis Neptunus parcit alumnis,
Quis tutos homines navibus esse putet.[1]

I am a dolphin whom the tide drove ashore against my will, an example showing what great dangers there are in the treacherous sea. For if Neptune does not spare even his own nurslings, who can think that men are safe in ships?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M5r f80r]

Das CXXII.

Wider den so auß unbarmhertzigkeit
der seinen verdirbt.

Mich Delphin hat mit gwalt an rand
Die Meeres Wellen gstossen zLand
Bin also ein Exempel und Bild
Der grossen gfar deß Meeres wild
Dann so Neptun selbs nit verschont
Sein eigen Diener drinn bewont
Wer wolt dann glauben das die Leut
In Schiffen darvor weren gfreyt.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 7.216 (two lines omitted).


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Section: STULTITIA (Folly). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1r p65]

In temerarios.

The reckless

Aspicis aurigam currus Phaëtonta[1] paterni
Ignivomos ausum flectere Solis equos.
Maxima qui postquàm terris incendia sparsit:
Est temerè insesso lapsus ab axe miser.
Sic plerique rotis Fortunae ad sydera Reges
Evecti: ambitio quos iuvenilis agit:
Post magnam humani generis clademque suamque,
Cunctorum poenas denique dant scelerum.

You see here Phaethon, driving his father's chariot, and daring to guide the fire-breathing steeds of the Sun. After spreading great conflagrations over the earth, the wretched boy fell from the car he had so rashly mounted. - Even so, the majority of kings are borne up to heaven on the wheels of Fortune, driven by youth's ambition. After they have brought great disaster on the human race and themselves, they finally pay the penalty for all their crimes.

Notes:

1.  Phaethon, the son of Apollo, the sun-god. The myth referred to here is told in Ovid, Metamorphoses 1.748 - 2.349. Both Phaethon and Icarus (see [A50a103]) are types of those who aim too high and do not recognise their proper sphere.


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