Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N1v f84v]

EMBLEMA CXXX.

Iusta ultio.

Just revenge

Raptabat volucres captum pede corvus in auras,
Scorpion audaci praemia parta gulae.
Ast ille infuso sensim per membra veneno,
Raptorem in stygias compulit ultor aquas.
O risu res digna: aliis qui fata parabat,
Ipse perit propriis succubuitque dolis.[1]

A raven was carrying off into the flying winds a scorpion gripped in its talons, a prize won for its audacious gullet. But the scorpion, injecting its poison drop by drop through the raven’s limbs, despatched the predator to the waters of the Styx and so took its revenge. What a laughable thing! The one who was preparing death for others himself perishes and has succumbed to his own wiles.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N2r f85r]

Das CXXX.

Billiche verdiente Rach.

Der Rab ein Scorpion voll Gifft
Fieng, und führte in hoch in die lüfft
Bald seiner fressigkeit so jach
Empfieng verdienten lon und rach
Dann der Scorpion allgemacht
Das Gifft ins Rabn Glieder bracht
Recht sich an seinem Rauber bald
Nimpt im das Leben mit gewalt
Es ist fürwar deß lachens wehrt
Das der andern ein Brey anrört
Denselben er muß essen auß
Und kompt sein untreuw im zu hauß.

Notes:

1.  This is a fairly free translation of Anthologia graeca 9.339. See Erasmus, Adagia 58, Cornix scorpium, where the Greek epigram is again translated.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N3r p197]

Inanis impetus.

Antagonism that achieves nothing

EMBLEMA CLXIV.

Lunarem noctu, ut speculum,[1] canis inspicit orbem:
Seque videns, alium credit inesse canem,[2]
Et latrat: sed frustrà agitur vox irrita ventis,
Et peragit cursus surda Diana suos.[3]

A dog at night is looking into the moon’s disk as into a mirror and seeing himself, thinks there is another dog there; and he barks - but the sound is carried away, ineffectual, on the winds. Diana, unhearing, pursues her course.

Notes:

1.  For the theory of the moon’s disk as a mirror reflecting things on earth, see Plutarch, De facie in orbe lunae, Moralia, 920ff.

2.  Variant reading, altum credit inesse canem, ‘thinks there is a dog up there’.

3.  Diana is of course goddess of the moon.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

  • Inutility, Noxiousness; 'Nocumento', 'Nocumento d'ogni cosa' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54BB3(+4):56E3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Diana as moon-goddess, i.e. Luna (Selene) [92C371] Search | Browse Iconclass

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions