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EMBLEMA CXLI.

Invidia.

Envy

Squallida vipereas manducans foemina carnes,
Cuique dolent oculi[1] quaeque suum cor edit,
Quam macies, & pallor habent, spinosaque gestat
Tela manu. Talis pingitur invidia.[2]

A filthy woman chewing the flesh of vipers, whose eyes give her pain, who gnaws her own heart, in the grip of emaciation and pallor, carrying prickly sticks in her hand - thus is Envy depicted.

Das CXLI.

Verbunst.

Ein garstig, helich, scheutzlich Weib
Das der Schlangen fleisch frist und leib
Mit einem blden bsen Gsicht
Und das ir eigen Hertz hinricht
Die auch bleich gel dr und verzert
Ist und mit scharpffen dornen gwert
Die sie in der Hand tregt so grassz
Wirt gmalt die verbunst neid und hassz.

Notes:

1. Oculi dolent is a proverbial expression, referring to the pain of seeing what one does not like.

2. This description is taken from Ovid, Metamorphoses, 2.760ff., a depiction of the House of Envy.


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    Ira.

    Rage.

    LXIX [=70] .

    Alceam veteres caudam dixere leonis.
    Qua stimulante iras concipit ille graves.
    Lutea cm surgit bilis, crudescit & atro
    Felle dolor, furias excitat indomitas.[1]

    The ancients called the lion’s tail alcaea, for under its stimulus he takes on dreadful fury. When the yellow bile rises and his temper grows savage with the black gall, the tail incites his indomitable rage.

    Notes:

    1. The Greek word ἀλκαία was supposedly derived from ἀλκή ‘strength’ (see emblem 286, n.3 [A56a286]). The Etymologicum Magnum, an ancient Greek lexicon, defines ἀλκαία as ‘properly the tail of the lion, because it urges him on to strength (ἀλκή)’. Pliny, Natural History, 8.16.49, describes how the lion’s tail lashes with increasing fury and spurs him on. See also Aelian, De natura animalium, 5.39.


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      • beasts of prey, predatory animals: lion (+ silent means of communication of animal(s): wagging of tail etc.) [25F23(LION)(+491)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • tail of an animal «« QUEUE OF KEY (343) TO 34(+9) zoological aspects of animals ~ man and animal [34(+9343)] Search | Browse Iconclass
      • Rage, Anger (+ emblematical representation of oddslot concept) [56E2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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