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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[R4r f119r]

EMBLEMA CXC [=189] .

Obnoxia infirmitas.

Weakness is vulnerable

Pisciculos Orata [=Aurata] rapit medio aequore sardas,
Ni fugiant pavidae summa marisque petant?
Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[R4v f119v]Ast ibi sunt mergis fulicisque voracibus esca
Eheu intuta manens undique debilitas.

The little sardines the golden wrasse swallows in the depths of the ocean, unless in fear they flee and make for the surface of the sea. But there they provide a meal for greedy divers and other sea-birds. Alas for weakness, remaining everywhere at risk.

Das CXC [=189] .

Wolgeplagte Armut.

Die Goldbra▀men im mitten Meer
Die Fischlein Sardein engstet sehr
Wann sie nicht fliehen also gschwind
Zu ÷berst sie gefressen sind
Aber da werdens graubt zur Spei▀
Von Bre▀lin und Merchen on grei▀
Ach Gott wie ist die arm schwachheit
An allen orten nider gleidt.


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    Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[E6r]

    ELOQUENTIA FORTITU-
    dine praestantior.[1]

    Eloquence superior to strength

    Arcum leva tenet, rigidam fert dextera clavam,
    Contegit & Nemees corpora nuda leo.
    Herculis haec igitur facies? non convenit illud,
    Qu˛d vetus & senio tempora cana gerit.
    Quid quod lingua illi levibus traiecta cathenis,
    Quţs fissa facili allicit aure viros.
    Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[E6v]An ne quod Alcyden lingua non robore Galli,
    Praestantem populis iura dedisse ferunt.
    Cedunt arma togae,[2] & quamvis durissima corda,
    Eloquio pollens ad sua vota trahit.

    His left hand holds a bow, his right hand a stout club, the lion of Nemea clothes his bare body. So this is a figure of Hercules. But he is old and his temples grizzled with age - that does not fit. What of the fact that his tongue has light chains passing through it, by which he draws men along with ready ears pierced? The reason is surely that the Gauls say that Alceus’ descendant excelled in eloquence rather than might and gave laws to the nations. - Weapons yield to the arts of peace, and even the hardest of hearts the skilled speaker can lead where he will.

    Notes:

    1. áThis epigram is closely based on Lucian’s essay, The Gallic Hercules.

    2. áCf. Cicero’s notorious line, Cedant arma togae, concedat laurea linguae, ‘Let weapons yield to the arts of peace, let laurels yield to eloquence’ (quoted in Quintilian, Institutio oratoria 11.1.24).


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    • ears [31A2213] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Europeans (with NAME) [32B311(FRENCHMEN)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • 'litterae', symbolic representations, allegories and emblems ~ literature; 'Lettere' (Ripa) [48C90] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Power of Eloquence; 'Forza sottoposta all'Eloquenza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52D31(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generositÓ dell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virt¨ del animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) [54A7] Search | Browse Iconclass

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