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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[Q3v p246]

Buxus.

The box-tree

EMBLEMA CCVII.

Perpetuo viridis, crispoque cacumine buxus,
Unde est disparibus fistula facta modis,[1]
Deliciis apta est teneris & amantibus arbor:
Pallor inest illi, pallet & omnis amans.[2]

The box-tree is evergreen, with crinkly shoots. From it was made the pipe with its variously pitched notes. It is a tree appropriate to tender delights and to lovers. Box-wood is pale and so is every lover.

Notes:

1.For pipes of boxwood, see e.g. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.30.

2.pallet et omnis amans, ‘pale...is every lover’. The lover should affect pallor and emaciation, as these will soften the lady’s heart; see Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.729ff.


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  • lovers; courting, flirting [33C2] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • panpipes [48C7353] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Pleasure, Enjoyment, Joy; 'Allegrezza', 'Allegrezza da le medaglie', 'Allegrezza, letitia e giubilo', 'Diletto', 'Piacere', 'Piacere honesto' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56B1(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[O5r p217]

Insignia PoŽtarum.

Insignia of poets

EMBLEMA CLXXXIII.

Gentiles clypeos sunt qui in Iovis alite gestant,
Sunt quibus aut serpens, aut leo, signa ferunt:
Dira sed haec vatum fugiant animalia ceras,
Doctaque sustineat stemmata pulcher Olor.
Hic Phoebo sacer[1], & nostrae regionis alumnus:
Rex olim[2], veteres servat adhuc titulos.

Some have a family crest distinguished by the bird of Jove, for others the serpent or the lion provides the sign. But let these dread beasts flee from poets’ images; let the lovely swan support their learned clan. This bird is sacred to Phoebus and is a nursling of my homeland. A king once, it still preserves its ancient titles.

Notes:

1.‘sacred to Phoebus’, i.e. to the god of music and poetry (Apollo).

2.‘a king once’. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 2.367ff. for the story of Cycnus, king of Liguria, turned into a swan and inhabiting the marshes and lakes of the plain of the Po (Alciato’s homeland).


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