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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D7r p61]

Il se fault endurcir contre les ad-
versitez praesentes.

APOSTROPHE.

Contre la charge hault la Palme s’eleve
Et croist tant plus, que sa charge est plus greve,[1]
Glandz odorans portant, & delectables,[2]
Ayans l’honneur premier es bonnes tables.
Or monte (enfant) es rameaulx le fruyct pris:
Car Qui sera constant: aura le pris.

Pour quelque adversité, ou contrarieté qui advien-
ne, point ne fault laisser une bonne entreprinse, Mais
perseverer constamment jusque à fin heureuse.

Notes:

1.  The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree.

2.  See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [l7r p173]

In subitum terrorem.

Sudden terror

CV.

Effuso cernens fugientes agmine turmas,
Quis mea nunc inflat cornua? Faunus[1] ait.

Seeing the squadrons fleeing, their line in disarray, ‘Who now’, said Faunus, ‘is sounding my trumpets?’

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [l7v p174]

COMMENTARIA.

Faunus cùm videret copias perterritas &
fugientes, gloriabundus secum dicit: quis
nunc inflat mea cornua tantum timorem ex-
citans? Faunus aliàs Pan, Deus rusticorum
& pastorum à Poëtis fingitur: Horatius libro 3.
carminum Oda 18. Veteris creditum fuit hunc
Deum repentinos timores & anni perturba-
tiones hominibus immittere, sed omnino
inanes, quales plerunque in bellis accidere so-
let, hinc proverbium manavit, panicus ter-
ror seu casus: de quò prolixius Angelus Poli-
tianus
in miscellaneis annotationibus 28. Sunt autem Faunii
qui & Satyri appellantur & Sylvani,
monstra Aethiopica specie huma-
na, cornigera & caprinis pedi-
bus valde luxuriosa, enar-
rat Leonicus lib. 2. cap.
24. de varia hi-
storia.

Notes:

1.  Faunus is here equated with Pan, the half-goat rustic god ([A56a277]), accredited with the invention of the horn or military trumpet, and responsible for unexplained ‘panic’ terrors seizing man and beast, especially on the battle-field and in wild lonely places. See Erasmus, Adagia 2603, Panicus casus.


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  • Fear, Dread; 'Paura', 'Timidit� o Timore', 'Timore' (Ripa) [56DD1] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Alarm, Fright; 'Spavento', 'Terrore' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [56DD32(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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