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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F3r p85]

Les Coquuz.

PROBLEME.

D’ond vient cela, que Lombardz citadins
Nomment coquuz, paysans Contadins?
Le coquu chante au primtemps. L’ors sont ceulx
(Qui n’hont pas faict leurs vignes) paresseux.[1]
Au nid d’aultruy ses oeufz le coquu pose,
Comme qui d’aultre adultere l’espouse.

Coquuz proprement ne sont pas ceulx
qui hont femme ribaulde, mais au contraire
ceulx qui couchent avec la femme d’aul-
truy. Le mot prins sur la nature de L’oy-
seau, qui pont ses oeufz au nid des aultres.

Notes:

1. See Pliny, Natural History, 18.66.249, and Horace, Satires, 1.7.31, for the use of the word ‘cuckoo’ as term of mockery for the idle man who has failed to finish pruning his vines before the cuckoo is heard calling.


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    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [N2v p196]

    In eum qui sibi ipsi[1] damnum
    apparat.

    One who brings about his own downfall

    Capra, lupum non sponte meo nunc ubere lacto,
    Qud mal pastoris provida cura iubet.[2]
    Creverit ille simul, mea me pst ubera pascet.
    Improbitas nullo flectitur obsequio.[3]

    I am a goat giving suck against my will - to a wolf. The improvident kindness of the shepherd makes me do this. Once the wolf has grown, after feeding at my teats, he will then eat me. Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered.

    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [N3r p197]

    A ceulx qui saprestent dommaige.

    Voyez moy paovre & simple chievre,
    Qui laisse ung loup mon pis teter.
    Jen suis dolente, & pis que en fievre.
    Car mal men sentiray traicter.
    Mon maistre deust bien regretter
    Cest acte, sil fust homme expert:
    Veu quon a sceu pieca noter,[4]
    Que en tous meschans, plaisir se perd.

    Notes:

    1. Textual variant: ‘ipsi’ omitted.

    2. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.47. For the content cf. Aesop, Fables 313-5.

    3. ‘Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered’. See Erasmus, Adagia 1086, Ale luporum catulos.

    4. This line is revised, cf. 1536 edition.


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