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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G2r p99]

Garder se fault des Paillardes.

Tel povoir heut Circe fille au Soleil,
Qu’elle muoit l’homme en beste soubz l’oeil:
Tesmoing de Pic,[1] & de Scylla l’histoire,[2]
Er [=Et] des Ithacz faictz porceaulx,[3] apres boire:
Circé Putain est en comparaison,[4]
Qui putain aime il perd sens, & raison.

Par les Paillardes les hommes sont abestiz, de-
venans luxurieux comme boucz, gourmans
comme pourceaulx, envieux, & quereleux,
comme chiens, paresseux comme asnes.

Notes:

1.  Picus, an Italian king, a breeder of horses, turned into a woodpecker by Circe. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.320ff

2.  Scylla was transformed into a figure that was half girl, half barking dogs. See Ovid, Metamorphoses, 14.51ff. Cf. Emblem 62 ([FALb062]).

3.  Ithacans: See Homer, Odyssey, 10.229ff. for the story of Ulysses’ sailors (from the island of Ithaca), who were turned into pigs by Circe with a magic potion of wine.

4.  See Anthologia Graeca, 10.50 for this rationalisation of the Circe story.


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    • whore, prostitute [33C520] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • pig [47I212] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Reason versus Amorous Lust; 'Combattimento della ragione con l'appetito' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52B513(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Danger; 'Pericolo' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54DD51(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Ulysses' companions are changed into all kinds of animals (+ variant) [97C81(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Picus changed into a woodpecker: Circe changes Picus into a woodpecker because, faithful to his wife Canens, he spurns the love of the goddess (Ovid, Metamorphoses XIV 386) (+ variant) [97D28(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass
    • Scylla changed into a sea-monster: Circe, to whom Glaucus has applied for aid in his love suit, changes Scylla the sea-nymph into a sea-monster (Ovid, Metamorphoses XIV 59) (+ variant) [97EE3(+0)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n6r p203]

    Furor, & rabies.

    Fury and madness

    XLIX.

    Ora gerit clypeus rabiosi picta leonis,
    Et scriptum in summo margine carmen habet:
    Hic hominum est terror, cuius possessor Atrida.
    Talia magnanimus signa Agamemno tulit.[1]

    The shield bears the painted face of a raging lion, and inscribed upon the upper margin has a verse: ‘This is the terror of men, and the son of Atreus is its possessor’. Haughty Agamemnon bore this symbolic figure.

    Notes:

    1.  This poem is based on Pausanias, Periegesis, 5.19.4. For the ‘raging lion’. Cf. Emblem 270,‘Ira’ ([A56a270]). For Agamemnon’s savage temper, see e.g. Homer, Iliad, 1.103-4.


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