Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc1r f277r]

Abies.

The fir tree

Emblema cci.

Apta fretis abies in montibus editur altis:
Est & in adversis maxima commoditas.[1]

The fir tree that is fit to sail the sea grows high up on the hills. Even in hard circumstances, there is great advantage to be found.

ABietis schema potest accommodari iis, qui quan-
quam in loco satis commodo versentur, tamen ad
ampliorem quaestum faciendum sese periculis obii-
cere non reformidant.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Cc1v f277v]

Le sapin.

LE Sapin sur montagnes croit,
Et sur l’eau utilement passe:
Ainsi assez souvent on voit
Qu’à profit on change de place.

LA figure du sapin peust estre accommodee
à ceux qui combien qu’ils soyent assez
aisez où ils sont, toutesfois pour faire plus
grand gain, ne font difficulté de se mettre
au hazard.

Notes:

1.  This is because it grows strong by withstanding the gales and harsh weather. Contrast Anthologia Graeca, 9.30ff, 105, and the much-translated 376 for an opposing view of the fir tree: “how can the fir, storm-tossed while growing on land, resist the gales at sea?” 9.31 was translated by Alciato (Selecta epigrammata, p. 98).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Section: ARBORES (Trees). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O6r p219]

Hedera.

Ivy

Haudquaquam arescens hederae est arbuscula, Cisso[1]
Quae puero Bacchum dona dedisse ferunt:
Errabunda, procax, auratis fulva corymbis,
Exterius viridis, caetera pallor habet.
Hinc aptis vates cingunt sua tempora sertis:[2]
Pallescunt studiis, laus diuturna viret.

There is a bushy plant which never withers, the ivy which Bacchus, they say, gave as a gift to the boy Cissos. It goes where it will, uncontrollable; tawny where the golden berry-clusters hang; green on the outside but pale everywhere else. Poets use it to wreathe their brows with garlands that fit them well - poets are pale with study, but their praise remains green for ever.

Notes:

1.  Κισσός is the Greek word for ‘ivy’. For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

2.  vates cingunt sua tempora, ‘Poets use it to wreathe their brows’. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions