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AD IDEM.

The same

Alveolis dum mella legit, percussit amorem,
Furacem mala apes, & summis spicula liquit,
In digitis, tumido gemit at puer ungue [=anxius ungue] .[1]
Et quatit errabundus humum, Venerique dolorem,
Indicat & graviter quaeritur quod apicula parvum
Ipsa inferre animal tam noxia vulnera possit.
Cui ridens Venus, hanc imitaris tu quoque dixit,
Nate feram, qui das tot noxia vulnera parvus.[2]

While he was taking honey from the hives, a vicious bee stung thieving Amor, and left its sting in the end of his finger. The boy in distress cried out as his finger-end swelled up. He ran about, stamping his foot, showed his hurt to Venus, and complained bitterly that a little bee, that tiny creature, could inflict such grievous wounds. Venus smiled at him and said, “You are like this creature, my son; small as you are you deal many a grievous wound”.

Notes:

1.anxius is added here from the 1534 Paris/Wechel edition onwards. Omission upsets the scansion.

2.In later editions, this becomes clearly a separate emblem, but here should perhaps more properly be regarded as a second subscriptio for the previous emblem.


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    Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[X3r f163r]

    IN RECEPTATORES SI-
    cariorum.

    Those who harbour cut-throats

    Emblema. 52.

    Latronum, furumque manus tibi saeva[1] per urbem
    It comes, & diris cuncta [=cincta] cohors gladiis:
    Atque ita te mentis generosum prodige censes,
    Quod tua complures alicit olla malos.
    En novus Actaeon, qui postquam cornua sumpsit,
    In praedam canibus se dedit ipse suis.[2]

    A fierce band of ruffians and thieves accompanies you about the city, a gang of supporters armed with lethal swords. And so, you wastrel, you consider yourself a fine lordly fellow because your cooking pot draws in crowds of scoundrels. - Here’s a fresh Actaeon - he, after he grew his horns, became the prey of his own hunting dogs.

    Notes:

    1.Other editions read scaeva, ‘evil-minded’. The capital letter in some editions suggests that the Latin word could be taken as a proper name in the vocative case, i.e addressing one Scaeva.

    2.For the story of Actaeon turned into a stag and killed by his own hounds, see Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.138ff. Similarly, the hangers-on will destroy the one who has fed them.


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