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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M8v p192]

Captivus ob gulam.

Caught by greed

LXXXVI.

Regnator penus, & mensae corrosor[1] herilis
Ostrea mus summis vidit hiulca labris.
Queis teneram apponens barbam falsa ossa momordit,
Illa recluserunt[2] tacta repente domum.
Deprensum & tetro tenuerunt carcere furem,
Semet in obscurum qui dederat tumulum.[3]

A mouse, king of the pantry, nibbler at the master’s table, saw oysters with their shells just slightly open. Applying his sensitive whiskers, he nibbled the deceptive bone. The oysters, when touched, suddenly slammed shut their house and held the thief, caught red-handed, in a noisome prison, a thief who had put himself into a lightless tomb.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N1r p193]

Gefangen umb den fraß.

LXXXVI.

Ein schleckhafft und gefraeßig mauß
Ein merschneck in der kuche ersach,
Der halb geoeffnet het sein hauß,
Darein stieß sy ir maul mit gach,
Das yr der schneck knischt und zerbrach,
Wie er sich einzoch und beschloß:
Mancher kumbt noch in ungemach,
Der alles fraß wil sein genoß.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: ‘Regnatorque penus, mensaeque arrosor’.

2.  Textual variant: ‘Ast ea clauserunt’.

3.  This poem is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.86.


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  • Gluttony, Intemperance, 'Gula'; 'Gola', 'Ingordigia', 'Ingordigia overo Avidità', 'Voracità' (Ripa) ~ personification of one of the Seven Deadly Sins [11N35] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • law and jurisprudence (+ imprisonment) [44G(+56)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Intemperance, Immoderation (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54AA43(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Z3v f179v]

CUCULI.

Cuckoos

Emblema. 60.

Ruricolas, agreste genus, plerique cuculos
Cur vocitent, quaenam prodita causa fuit?[1]
Vere novo cantat Coccyx, quo tempore vites
Qui non absolvit, iure notatur[2] iners.
Fert ova in nidos alienos, qualiter ille
Cui thalamum prodit uxor adulterio.

Whatever explanation has been given for the custom of calling country-dwellers, that rustic race, ‘cuckoos’? - When spring is new, the cuckoo calls, and anyone who has not pruned his vines by this time is rightly blamed for being idle. The cuckoo desposits its eggs in other birds’ nests, like the man on whose account a wife betrays her marriage bed in adultery.

Notes:

1.  See Pliny, Natural History, 18.66.249, and Horace, Satires, 1.7.31, for the use of the word ‘cuckoo’ as term of mockery for the idle man who has failed to finish pruning his vines before the cuckoo is heard calling.

2.  In some editions, vocatur for notatur.


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