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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[B2v p20]

Gratiam referendam.

Show gratitude.

V.

AŽrio insignis pietate Ciconia nido,
Investes pullos pignora grata fovet.
Taliaque expectat sibi munera mutua reddi,
Auxilio hoc quoties mater egebit anus.
Nec pia spem soboles fallit, sed fessa parentum
Corpora fert humeris, praestat & ore cibos.[1]

The stork, famed for its dutiful care, in its airy nest cherishes its featherless chicks, its dear pledges of love. The mother bird expects that the same kind of service will be shown her in return, whenever she needs such help in her old age. Nor does the dutiful brood disappoint this hope, but bears its parents’ weary bodies on its wings and offers food with its beak.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[B3r p21]

Recognoistre bienfaict.

V.

La Cigoigne en l’espoir estant,
Que sez petiz mis hors d’enfance,
Luy rendront du plaisir autant,
Met peine a leur donner substance,
Dont ilz font grand recognoissance.
Car au temps que plus force nŠ,
On luy fournist vol & pitance.
Ainsi prent, ce qu’elle donna.

Notes:

1.See Pliny, Natural History 10.32.63: cranes care for their parents’ old age in their turn. See also Aelian, De natura animalium 3.23.


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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[Ll1r f265r]

QUI ALTA CONTEMPLANTUR
cadere.

Those who contemplate the heights come to grief

Emblema 103.

Dum turdos visco, pedica dum fallit alaudas,
Et iacta altivolam figit[1] arundo gruem,
Dipsada non prudens auceps pede perculit: ultrix
Illa mali, emissum virus ab ore iacit.
Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[Ll1v f265v]Sic obit, extento qui sidera respicit arcu,
Securus fati quod iacet ante pedes.[2]

While he tricks thrushes with bird-lime, larks with snares, while his speeding shaft pierces the high-flying crane, the careless bird-hunter steps on a snake; avenging the injury, it spits the darting venom from its jaws. So he dies, a man who gazes at the stars with bow at the ready, oblivious of the mishap lying before his feet.

Notes:

1.Corrected by hand in the Glasgow copy.

2.See Anthologia graeca 7.172 and Aesop, Fables 137.


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