Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H2v p116]

In astrologos.

Against astrologers

LIII.

Icare per superos qui raptus & ara, donec
In mare praecipitem cera liquata daret.[1]
Nunc te cera eadem fervensque resuscitat ignis,[2]
Exemplo ut doceas dogmata certa tuo.
Astrologus caveat quicquam praedicere, praeceps
Nam cadet impostor dum super astra vehit[3].

Icarus, you were carried through the heights of heaven and through the air, until the melted wax cast you headlong into the sea. Now the same wax and the burning fire raise you up again, so that by your example you may provide sure teaching. Let the astrologer beware of prediction. Headlong will the imposter fall, as he flies beyond the stars.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [H3r p117]

Contre Astrologues.

LIII.

Icarus cheut dedans la mer
Par trop grande exaltation:
Cil qui veult le ciel entamer,
Est trop plain de presumption:
Donques sur ceste fiction,
Doibvent garder les astrologues,
Que leur haulte discussion,
Les mette ou dieu reduit tous rogues.

Notes:

1. Cf. Anthologia graeca 16.107, a poem on a bronze statue of Icarus, translated by Alciato at Selecta epigrammata (Cornarius, ed.) p.333. Icarus and his father Daedalus ([A42a008] notes) escaped from King Minos of Crete on wings of feathers and wax. Icarus was over-bold and flew too near the sun; when his wings melted, he crashed into the Icarian Sea and was drowned. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183ff. Icarus, like Phaethon ([A42a064]) was a type of those who do not keep to their proper station.

2. ‘same wax...fire’: a reference to the cire perdue method of casting statues.

3. Textual variant: volat.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Ddd2r f394r as 392]

IUSTA VINDICTA.

Just recompense

Emblema 170.

Dum[1] residet Cyclops sinuosi in faucibus antri,
Haec secum teneras concinit inter oves:
Pascite vos herbas, sociis ego pascar Achivis,
Postremumque Utin viscera nostra ferent.
Audiit haec Itachus, Cyclopaque lumine cassum
Reddidit, en paenas ut suus auctor habet[2]?[3]

Sitting in the mouth of his arching cave, the Cyclops sang thus to himself amidst his gentle sheep: Do you feed on grass; I shall feed on the Greek companions, and last of all my belly shall get No-man. The man from Ithaca heard this and made the Cyclops eyeless. See how the one who plotted misfortune collects it himself!

Notes:

1. Corrected from the Errata.

2. A proverbial sentiment: cf. Erasmus, Adagia 3091, Di tibi dent tuam mentem.

3. For the story of Ulysses (the man from Ithaca) in the Cyclops’ cave and his escape by blinding the Cyclops, see Homer, Odyssey 9.177 ff. Ulysses had told the Cyclops his name was No-man. (Utis l. 4).


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions