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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L1v p162]

In eum qui truculentia suorum perierit.

On one who perished through the savagery of his own people.

LXXV.

Delphinem invitum me in littora compulit aestus,
Exemplum infido quanta pericla mari.
Nam si nec propriis Neptunus parcit alumnis,
Quis tutos homines navibus esse putet?[1]

I am a dolphin whom the tide drove ashore against my will, an example showing what great dangers there are in the treacherous sea. For if Neptune does not spare even his own nurslings, who can think that men are safe in ships?

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L2r p163]

A cil qui a mal par les siens.

LXXV.

Je Daulphin de la Mer natif,
Ayant prins en elle substance,
Ne pensoye point estre aprentif,
En son amour & accointance:
Or sens je ores son inconstance,
Gisant au soleil sur la greve.
Ce n’est doncq’ estrange sentence,
Quand la faulce Mer l’homme griefve.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Anthologia graeca 7.216 (two lines omitted).


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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Ddd7r f399r as 397]

PAREM DELINQUENTIS, ET
suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Emblema 172.

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queis ille excusat, quod nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi: Quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[1]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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