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Section: LES ARBRES. View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R3r p261]

L’hierre.[1]

L’hierre est un">ung arbre en verdeur triumphant,
Duquel Bacchus feit don à Cisse enfant,[2]
Errant gravit: ha grains d’or en couleur,
Verd par dedans, tout le reste ha palleur.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [R3v p262] Poetes doncq’, en ont les chefz couvers,[3]
Palles d’estude: en honneur tousjours verdz.

Les Poetes se coronnent de Laurier
& de L’hierre, qui tousjours verdoye
par dedans, par dehors est palle, & por
te bayes de couleur d’or, pour enseigne
que ilz sont palles d’estude par dehors,
& dedans leurs escriptz tousjours re-
verdissans par eternel honneur, pre-
cieux & illustres comme l’or.

Notes:

1.  The woodcut here is a fairly close, laterally inverted, copy of that used in the 1549 French edition.

2.  For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

3.  See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Iii1r p865]

Hedera.

Ivy

EMBLEMA CCV.

Haudquaquam arescens Hederae est arbuscula, Cisso[1]
Quae puero Bacchum dona dedisse ferunt:
Errabunda, procax, auratis fulva corymbis,
Exterius viridis, caetera pallor habet.
Hinc aptis vates cingunt sua tempora sertis:[2]
Pallescunt studiis, laus diuturna viret.

There is a bushy plant which never withers, the ivy which Bacchus, they say, gave as a gift to the boy Cissos. It goes where it will, uncontrollable; tawny where the golden berry-clusters hang; green on the outside but pale everywhere else. Poets use it to wreathe their brows with garlands that fit them well - poets are pale with study, but their praise remains green for ever.

Notes:

1.  Κισσός is the Greek word for ‘ivy’. For the story of Cissos, beloved of Bacchus, and his transformation into the ivy, see Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 12.188ff.

2.  vates cingunt sua tempora, ‘Poets use it to wreathe their brows’. See Pliny, Natural History, 16.62.147: poets use the species with yellow berries for garlands.


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