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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Ddd7r f399r as 397]

PAREM DELINQUENTIS, ET
suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Emblema 172.

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queis ille excusat, quod nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi: Quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[1]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [C7r]

IN ASTROLOGOS.

Against astrologers

Icare per superos qui raptus & aëra donec
In mare praecipitem caera liquata daret.[1]
Nunc te caera eadem fervensque resuscitat ignis,[2]
Exemplo ut doceas dogmata certa tuo.
Astrologus caveat quicquam praedicere preceps,
Nam cadet impostor dum super astra vehit[3].

Icarus, you were carried through the heights of heaven and through the air, until the melted wax cast you headlong into the sea. Now the same wax and the burning fire raise you up again, so that by your example you may provide sure teaching. Let the astrologer beware of prediction. Headlong will the imposter fall, as he flies beyond the stars.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Anthologia graeca 16.107, a poem on a bronze statue of Icarus, translated by Alciato at Selecta epigrammata (Cornarius, ed.) p.333. Icarus and his father Daedalus ([A31a008] notes) escaped from King Minos of Crete on wings of feathers and wax. Icarus was over-bold and flew too near the sun; when his wings melted, he crashed into the Icarian Sea and was drowned. See Ovid, Metamorphoses 8.183ff. Icarus, like Phaethon ([A31a065]) was a type of those who do not keep to their proper station.

2.  ‘same wax...fire’: a reference to the cire perdue method of casting statues.

3.  Textual variant: volat.


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