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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G6r p107]

Juste vengeance.

LXXIIII.

Le Scorpion prins du Corbeau,
Et emporté pour son manger,
Le picqua de queuë tout beau,
Luy donnant de mort le danger.
Ainsi a sceu son mal venger.
Où les lecteurs prudents comprennent,

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G6v p108]

Que quand fortune veut changer,
Bien souvent les preneurs se prennent.[1]

commentaires.

Le corbeau, oiseau devorant & larron, est tous-
jours apres à recercher des charongnes & autre proye
qu’il puisse devorer. Trouvant donc un scorpion, il le
print avec ses ongles crochues. Mais ce scorpion, beste
tresvenimeuse, picqua son preneur avec sa queue, si
qu’apres est devenu fort bouffi & enflé, il luy con-
vint mourir, & fut le preneur pris & vaincu, voire
esteinct. On void souvent advenir, que ceux qui dres-
sent des embusches aux autres, tombent eux mesmes
dans le fossé.

Notes:

1.  This is a fairly free translation of Anthologia graeca 9.339. See Erasmus, Adagia 58, Cornix scorpium, where the Greek epigram is again translated.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D6r]

IN STUDIOSUM CA-
ptum amore.

A scholar in the toils of love

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D6v]

Immersus studiis dicundo & iure peritus
Et maximus libellio.
Heliodoran[1] amat, quantum nec Thracius unquam,
Princeps sororis pellicem.[2]
Pallada cur alio superasti iudice cyprim [=Cypri]
Num stat [=sat] sub ida est vincere?[3] [4]

This man immersed in learning, this expert in expounding the law, this great bookman, loves Heliadora more passionately than the Thracian king ever desired the woman whom he took in her sister’s place. - Cyprian goddess, why have you defeated Pallas again with another man as judge? Isn’t it enough to have conquered on the slopes of Ida?

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: Helianiran. ‘Heliodora’; cf. a poem written to her by Philodemus in Anthologia graeca 5.155.

2.  ‘the Thracian king’, a reference to the story of Tereus who lusted after his wife’s sister. See [A50a070] notes.

3.  sub Ida, ‘on the slopes of Ida’, a reference to the ‘judgement of Paris’, when Paris, a shepherd on Mount Ida in Asia Minor, was chosen to arbitrate in a contest of beauty and awarded the ‘apple of beauty’ or ‘discord’ to Venus (the Cyprian goddess), who thus defeated the other two contenders, Hera (the queen of the gods) and Pallas Athene (goddess of learning).

4.  In the emblem Qua Dii vocant eundum ([A31a077]), we also see Mercury with horns.


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