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EMBLEMA CLXXXIIII [=183] .

Ex damno alterius alterius utilitas.

One man’s loss is another man’s gain

Dum saevis ruerent in mutua vulnera telis
Ungue leaena ferox, dente timendus aper,
Accurrit vultur spectatum, & prandia captat,
Gloria victoris, praeda futura sua est.[1]

While a lioness, vicious in claw, and a boar, fearsome for its tusks, were setting upon each other, inflicting mutual wounds with their savage weapons, a vulture hurried up to watch, lurking in expectation of a meal. The victor’s glory will belong to the one that gets the spoil.

Das CLXXXIIII [=183] .

Auß eines andern schaden eines an-
dern nutz.

Als gegn einander fielen ein
Die groß Löwin unds hauwend Schwein
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Q8v f115v] Und hauwen einander wunden tieff
Mit irem Gwer und scharpffen grieff
Der Geyr macht sich dar und schaut auff
Das im sein theil ja nicht entlauff
Die ehr der Sigent bringt davon
Der raub aber thut im zustohn.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Aesop 200 and 203.


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    PAX.

    Peace

    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E1v]

    Turrigeris humeris, dentis quoque barrus eburni,
    Qui superare ferox Martia bella solet. [M]
    Supposuit nunc colla iugo stimulisque subactus,
    Caesareos currus ad pia templa vehit.
    Vel fera cognoscit concordes undique gentes,
    Proiectisque armis munia pacis obit.[1]

    The elephant, with its tower-bearing shoulders and ivory tusk, a beast accustomed to dominate the conflicts of Mars with savage ravings, has now submitted its neck to the yoke: subdued by goads, it draws Caesar’s chariot to the holy temples. Even the beast recognises nations reconciled on every side, and rejecting the weapons of war, it performs the duties of peace.

    [Marginalia - link to text]Vide Suetonium in vita Gaii [Julii] Caesaris.[2]

    Notes:

    1.  This is translated from Anthologia graeca 9.285, which refers to an occasion under the Emperor Tiberius when the statue of the Deified Augustus was for the first time borne in procession in a chariot drawn by elephants.

    2.  The episode in Suetonius’s ‘Life of Julius Caesar’ (ch. 37) is not really relevant to this text.


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