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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [N1v p194]

AMITIE.

Amitie durante, voire apres la mort.[1]

Une Olme seiche, & sans fueille,[2] embrassa
La belle vigne, & sa verdeur dressa.
Recoignoissant naturel benefice,
Rendit le droict de mutuel office.
Donnant exemple, amys telz comparer,
Que mort aussi ne puisse separer.

La vraye amitié est de l’esperit, non du corps, l’esperit
est immortel: parquoy elle est immortelle, faisant fai
re debvoir d’amy, non seullement en la vie: mais aussi
apres la mort. Comme feit Alexandre à Hephestion.

Notes:

1.  See Erasmus’ famous variations on this theme in De copia (CWE 24. pp. 354-64).

2.  In ancient Italy young vines were often supported by elm trees. See Vergil, Georgics 1.2.


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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [A6r]

AMICITIA ETIAM POST
mortem durans.[1]

Friendship lasting even beyond death

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [A6v]

Arentem senio, nudam quoque frondibus ulmum,
Complexa est viridi vitis opaca coma.[2]
Agnoscitque vices naturae & grata parenti,
Officii reddit mutua iura suo,
Exemploque monet, tales nos quaerere amicos,
Quos neque disiungat foedere summa dies.

A vine shady with green foliage embraced an elm tree that was dried up with age and bare of leaves. The vine recognises the changes wrought by nature and, ever grateful, renders to the one that reared it the duty it owes in return. By the example it offers, the vine tells us to seek friends of such a sort that not even our final day will uncouple them from the bond of friendship.

Notes:

1.  See Erasmus’ famous variations on this theme in De copia (CWE 24. pp. 354-64).

2.  In ancient Italy young vines were often supported by elm trees. See Vergil, Georgics 1.2.


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