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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A8v p16]

In Silentium.

Silence

Cým tacet, haud quicquam differt sapientibus amens,
Stultitiae est index linguaque voxque suae.
Ergo premat labias, digitoque silentia signet,
Et sese Pharium vertat in Harpocratem[1].

When he is silent, the fool differs no whit from the wise. It is tongue and voice that betray his stupidity. Let him therefore put his finger to his lips and so mark silence, and turn himself into Egyptian Harpocrates.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[B1r p17]

A Silence.

Quand ung ignorant ne dit mot,
Il est bien pareil au scavant:
Et nest de saigesse remot,
Sinon quant il parle souvent:
Ta bouche ayt donc le doy devant,
Pour tenir de parler science.[2]
Ou seras Harpocras suyvant,
Dont lymage monstroit silence:

Notes:

1.Harpocrates, also known as Horus, was the son of the Egyptian divinity Isis. He avenged the murder of his father Osiris by Set/Typhon. He is often represented as an infant with his finger held to his mouth as a sign of silence and economy of words. See Plutarch, De Iside et Osiride 68.

2.The last 3 lines differ significantly from the 1536 edition.


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  • Wisdom; 'Sapienza', 'Sapienza humana', 'Sapienza vera' (Ripa) [52A51] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Ignorance; 'Ignoranza', 'Ignoranza di tutte le cose', 'Ignoranza in un ricco senza lettere' (Ripa) [52AA5] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Folly, Foolishness; 'Pazzia', 'Sciocchezza', 'Stoltitia' (Ripa) [52AA51] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Taciturnity; 'Secretezza', 'Secretezza overo Taciturnit√É∆í√ā ' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52DD3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A3v]

GRATIAM REFERENDAM.

Show gratitude.

Link to an image of this pageLink to an image of this page †[A4r]

AŽrio insignis pietate Ciconia nido,
Investos [=Investes] pullos pignora grata fovet,
Taliaque expectat sibi munera mutua reddi.
Auxilio hoc quoties mater egebit anus.
Nec pia spem soboles fallit, sed fessa parentum
Corpora fert humeris praestat & ore cibos.[1]

The stork, famed for its dutiful care, in its airy nest cherishes its featherless chicks, its dear pledges of love. The mother bird expects that the same kind of service will be shown her in return, whenever she needs such help in her old age. Nor does the dutiful brood disappoint this hope, but bears its parents’ weary bodies on its wings and offers food with its beak.

Notes:

1.See Pliny, Natural History 10.32.63: cranes care for their parents’ old age in their turn. See also Aelian, De natura animalium 3.23.


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