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EMBLEMA CXVII.

In receptatores sicariorum.

Those who harbour cut-throats

Latronum furumque manus tibi saeva[1] per urbem
It comes: & diris cincta cohors gladiis.
Atque ita te mentis generosum prodige censes,
Quod tua complures allicit olla malos,
En novus Actaeon, qui postquàm cornua sumpsit,
In praedam canibus se dedit ipse suis.[2]

A fierce band of ruffians and thieves accompanies you about the city, a gang of supporters armed with lethal swords. And so, you wastrel, you consider yourself a fine lordly fellow because your cooking pot draws in crowds of scoundrels. - Here’s a fresh Actaeon - he, after he grew his horns, became the prey of his own hunting dogs.

Das CXVII.

Wider die so sich zu der Landsknecht und
Buben Rott gesellen.

Dich Lurtsch, So du gehst durch dstat
Volget dir nach ein hauffen drat
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M2v f77v] Der frechen und verwegnen Knecht
Mit gwerter hand ein unnütz Gschlecht
Und meinst also seystdu alsdann
Dester Edler im Gschlecht und Stamm
Dieweil du hast an dich gehengt
Ein Gottloß Rott, durch miet und schenck
Sich an ein neuwen Actean
Welcher da er die Hörner gewan
Wurd er von seinen eigen Wind [=Hind]
Zerrissen und gefressen gschwind.

Notes:

1.  Other editions read scaeva, ‘evil-minded’. The capital letter in some editions suggests that the Latin word could be taken as a proper name in the vocative case, i.e addressing one Scaeva.

2.  For the story of Actaeon turned into a stag and killed by his own hounds, see Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.138ff. Similarly, the hangers-on will destroy the one who has fed them.


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FIDEI SYMBOLUM.

The symbol of good faith

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E7r]

Stet depictus honor tyrio velatus amictu,
Eiusque iungat nuda dextram veritas.
Sitque amor in medio castus,[1] cui tempora circum,
Rosa it, Dyones pulchrior cupidine.[2]
Constituunt haec signa fidem, reverentia honoris,
Quam fovet, alit amor, parturitque veritas.

Let Honour stand depicted, clothed in a garment of Tyrian purple, and let naked Truth hold his right hand. Between them, let chaste Love be represented, his brow garlanded with roses, but fairer than Cupid, Dione’s boy. These images constitute good faith, which the reverence due to Honour fosters, Love feeds, Truth brings to birth.

Notes:

1.  Amor...castus, ‘chaste love’ (Anteros), for which see [A34a072] and [A34a080].

2.  ‘Dione’s boy’. Strictly Dione was the mother of Venus, but was often identified in poetry with Venus herself, the mother of Cupid.


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