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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B3v p22]

Concordia.

Concord

VI.

Cornicum mira inter se concordia vitae est,
Inque vicem nunquàm contaminata fides.[1]
Hinc volucres has[2] sceptra gerunt, quod scilicet omnes
Consensu populi stantque caduntque duces:
Quem si de medio tollas, discordia praeceps
Advolat, & secum regia fata trahit.

Marvellous is the unanimity between crows as they live together, and their loyalty to each other, never dishonoured! For this reason the sceptre carries these birds. Assuredly all leaders stand and fall by the consent of the people. If you take away consent, tumultuous discord comes flying in and drags kings down in its wake.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B4r p23]

Concorde.

VI.

L’on peult parler avec merveilles,
De la paix, que chascun voit estre
Entre la turbe des corneilles,
Qui n’ont jamais valet ne maistre:
Pource les painct on sur le sceptre,
Que le peuple ostoit & donnoit:
Auquel quant discorde sceit naistre,
Tout se perd, chascun le cognoist.

Notes:

1.  See Aelian, De natura animalium 3.9. on the mutual love and loyalty of crows.

2.  Textual variant: haec.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [B6v p28]

Obdurandum adversus urgentia.

Stand firm against pressure

Nititur in pondus palma, & consurgit in arcum,
Quo magis & premitur hoc mage tollit onus.[1]
Fert & odoratas bellaria dulcia glandes,[2]
Queis mensas inter primus habetur honos.
I puer, & reptans ramis has collige, mentis
Qui constantis erit, praemia digna feret.

The wood of the palm-tree counteracts a weight and rises up into an arch. The heavier the burden pressing it down, the more it lifts it up. The palm-tree also bears fragrant dates, sweet dainties much valued when served at table. Go, boy, edge your way along the branches and gather them. The man who shows a resolute spirit will receive an appropriate reward.

Notes:

1.  The reaction of palm to a heavy weight is mentioned in various ancient sources, e.g. Pliny, Natural History 16.81.223; Aulus Gellius, Noctes Atticae 3.6. See also Erasmus, Parabolae p.263. It probably refers to a plank of palm-wood, rather than a branch of the living tree. A similar image is used in La Perriere, Morosophie, no. 83 ([FLPb083]).

2.  See Erasmus, Parabolae p.241: ‘the palm-tree, having bark with knife-sharp edges, is difficult to climb, but it bears delicious fruit’.


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