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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D6r p59]

Parem delinquentis et suasoris
culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica, victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turma tenet.
Queis ille excusat, quòd nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi, quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris, in arma cies.[1]

The victorious troop holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one’s side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

Notes:

1.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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  • prisoner in cell or locked place [44G313] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Guiltiness (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54AA52(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Recommendation, Inducement, Incitement (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54C2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Action; 'Operatione manifesta' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54D2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Equality, Equity, Fairness, Righteousness; 'Equalità', 'Equità', 'Giuditio giusto', 'Ordine dritto e giusto', 'Ugualità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [59C21(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D7r p61]

Cum larvis non luctandum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

Aeacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3],
Qui toties hosteis vicerat antè suos.
Comprimere haud potuit vocem insultantibus illis,
Dum curru, & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est, sic cassi luce leonis
Convellunt barbam, vel timidi lepores.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’. Textual variant: Aeacidae.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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