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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L6v f73v]

EMBLEMA CXI.

Temeritas.

Rashness

In praeceps rapitur, frustra quoque tendit habenas
Auriga: effrenis [=effreni] quem vehit oris equus.
Haud facilè huic credas, ratio quem nulla gubernat,
Et temerè proprio ducitur arbitrio.[1]

A driver pulled by a horse whose mouth does not respond to the bridle is rushed headlong and in vain drags on the reins. You cannot readily trust one whom no reason governs, one who is heedlessly taken where his fancy goes.

Das CXI.

Verwegenheit.

Gestürtzt werden muß der Furmann
Und umb sonst leitn beym zaum than
Die Pferdt so seyn unbendig wild
Und die man nit kan halten still
Dem fürwar nit wol ztrauwen ist
Der sich die vernunfft zu keinr frist
Füren last, sonder den da thut
Treiben allein sein eigner muth.

Notes:

1.  In general see Plato’s image of the chariot of the soul, Phaedrus, 246, as indicated in the commentary.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [F5v p90]

    Aere quandoque salutem redimendam.

    Sometimes money must be spent to purchase safety

    Et pedibus segnis, tumida & propendulus alvo
    Hac tamen insidias effugit arte fiber.
    Mordicus ipse sibi medicata virilia vellit
    Atque abiicit, sese gnarus ob illa peti,
    Huius ab exemplo disces non parcere rebus,
    Et vitam ut redimas, hostibus aera dare.[1]

    Though slow of foot and with swollen belly hanging down, the beaver nonetheless escapes the ambush by this trick: it tears off with its teeth its testicles, which are full of a medicinal substance, and throws them aside, knowing that it is hunted for their sake. - From this creature’s example you will learn not to spare material things, and to give money to the enemy to buy your life.

    Notes:

    1.  This is based on Aesop, Fables 153, where the same moral is drawn. For the information about the beaver, see Pliny, Natural History 8.47.109; Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines) 12.2.21.


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