Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G8v p112]

In avaros.

On the avaricious

Septitius populos inter ditissimus omnes,
Arva senex nullus quo magis ampla tenet.
Defraudans geniumque suum, mensasque paratas,
Nil praeter betas, duraque rapa vorat.
Cui similem dicam hunc, inopem quem copia reddit,
An ne asino? sic est, instar hic eius habet.
Nanque asinus dorso preciosa obsonia gestat,
Seque rubo aut dura carice pauper alit.[1]

Septitius is the richest man on earth; no old man has wider estates than he. Mean to himself and his dinner table, he chews nothing but beets and stringy turnips. To what shall I liken a man whose very wealth makes him a beggar? Shall it be an ass? That’s it - he is just like an ass. An ass carries a load of rich delicacies on his back, but, poor creature, feeds itself on brambles and tough grass.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H1r p113]

Contre Avaricieux.

Ung riche homme avaricieux,
A qui la terre ne suffist,
Perd somme & pastz delicieux,
Pour faire temporel proffict:
Dont semble a lasne, auquel lon feist
Porter du pain, vin, & chair dons:
Et il en malheur tout confict,
Ne menge que herbes & chardons.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Anthologia graeca 11.397, concerning a miser called Artemidorus.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G6v p108]

In facilč ą virtute desciscentes.

Easily deflected from the right course

Parva velut limax Remora spreto[1] impete venti,
Remorumque ratem sistere sola potest.
Sic quosdam ingenio & virtute ad sydera vectos,
Detinet in medio tramite causa levis.
Anxia lis veluti est, vel qui meretricius ardor
Egregiis iuvenes sevocat ą studiis.[2]

Just as the little slug, the remora, scorning the impetus of wind and oars, can by itself stop a ship from moving, so some trivial reason holds back in mid-course people who through intellect and ability are on their way to the stars: for example, a worrying law-suit, or that desire for whores which entices young men away from their good studies.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [G7r p109]

A ceulx qui facilement lais-
sent vertus.

Il est des gens, dont la nature
Est si noble, heureuse, & puissante,
Que silz suyvoient leur adventure,
Ilz auroient vers tout bon heur sente:
Peu de cas retient leur entente,
Com Remora grand nef retient.
Ainsi amours proces pour rente,
Lestude a vifz espritz detient.
Aultrement.
Aulcuns vigoureux desperit
Se arrestent a petit de chose,
Ce pendant leur temps se perit,
Aux amours proces noise enclose:
Ilz laissent loix, vers latins, prose,
Pour satisfaire a leur facon.
Cest comme la nef qui repose,
Par Remora petit poisson.

Notes:

1.  Textual variant: spreto Remora.

2.  [A39a052] notes, Cf. Erasmus, Parabolae pp.231, 253.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top