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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [g1v p98]

Aliquid mali propter vicinum
malum.[1]

Misfortune caused by a bad neighbour

LVIII.

Raptabat torrens ollas, quarum una metallo,
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [g2r p99 ]Altera erat figuli terrea facta manu.
Hanc igitur rogat illa, velit sibi proxima ferri,
Iuncta ut praecipites utraque sistat aquas:
Cui lutea, Haud nobis tua sunt commercia curae,
Ne mihi proximitas haec mala multa ferat.
Nam seu te nobis, seu nos tibi conferat unda,
Ipsa ego te fragilis sospite sola terar.

A stream was carrying along two pots, one of which was made of metal, the other formed by the potter’s hand of clay. The metal pot asked the clay one whether it would like to float along close beside it, so that each of them, by uniting with the other, could resist the rushing waters. The clay pot replied: The arrangement you propose does not appeal to me. I am afraid that such proximity will bring many misfortunes upon me. For whether the wave washes you against me or me against you, I only, being breakable, will be shattered, while you remain unharmed.

COMMENTARIA.

Fluvius accrescens rapiebat duas ollas,
quarum una ferrea erat, altera verò lutea, vo-
cabat autem aenea alteram, ut apud se propius
nataret quò simul facilius aquae violentiae re-
sistere possent. Cui terrea respondit, nolo
ego commercium nec vicinitatem tuam, quae
mihi non nisi nociva futura esse & damno-
sa, si enim forte undarum impetus nos colli-
deret, ego misera sola frangerer in frusta,
tu verò nihil omnino mali sentires. Et
hoc Aesopicum est de duobus Ol-
lis. Proverbio autem dicitur,
aliquid mali propter vi-
cinum malum. In
Chiliadibus.

Notes:

1.  See Avianus, Fables 11; Erasmus, Adagia 32, Aliquid mali propter vicinum malum.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H6v p124]

Cum larvis non luctandum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

Aeacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3],
Qui toties hosteis vicerat antè suos,
Comprimere haud potuit vocem insultantibus illis,
Dum curru & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est, sic cassi luce leonis,
Convellunt barbam vel timidi lepores.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H7r p125]

Non lucter contre ung mort.

Hector jusque a la mort blesse,
Fut par les Grecs ses haineux pris:
Et tantost de cordes trousse,
Lors dit a ceulx qui lont surpris:
Faictes comme avez entrepris:
Ores je vois vray le proverbe,
Que au lyon ja de mort empris,
Les lievres vont tirer la barbe.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’. Textual variant: Aeacidae.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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