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Section: PERFIDIA (Treachery). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[D6r p59]

Maledicentia.

Evil speaking

Archilochi[1] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[2] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

Notes:

1. áArchilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

2. áferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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  • Calumny, Detraction; 'Biasimo vitioso', 'Calunnia', 'Detrattione', 'Maledicenza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [57BB25(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[N6v p204]

Fidei symbolum.

The symbol of good faith

Stet depictus Honortyrio velatus amictu,
Eiusque iungat nuda dextram Veritas.
Sitque Amor in medio castus,[1] cui tempora circum
Rosa it, Diones pulchrior Cupidine.[2]
Constituunt haec signa fidem, reverentia Honoris
Quam fovet, alit Amor, parturitque Veritas.

Let Honour stand depicted, clothed in a garment of Tyrian purple, and let naked Truth hold his right hand. Between them, let chaste Love be represented, his brow garlanded with roses, but fairer than Cupid, Dione’s boy. These images constitute good faith, which the reverence due to Honour fosters, Love feeds, Truth brings to birth.

Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[N7r p205]

La divise de Foy.

Honneur descarlate vestu,
Touchant en main a Verite,
Entre eulx deux amour de vertu.
Qui a lart de Venus quicte.
Lhistoire est de fidelite,
Estant par vray dire produicte,
Damour nourrie en purite,
Et soubz crainte dhonneur conduite.

Notes:

1. áAmor...castus, ‘chaste love’ (Anteros), for which see [A39a072] and [A39a081].

2. á‘Dione’s boy’. Strictly Dione was the mother of Venus, but was often identified in poetry with Venus herself, the mother of Cupid.


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