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IN DEO LAETANDUM.

Joy is to be found in God

Aspice ut egregium[1] puerum Iovis alite pictor
Fecerit, Iliacum[2] summa per astra vehi.
Quis ne Iovem tactum puerili credat amore?
Dic haec Maeonius[3] finxerit unde senex?
Consilium mens atque dei cui gaudia praestant,
Creditur is summo raptus adesse Iovis.

See how the illustrator has shown the illustrious Trojan boy being carried through the highest heavens by the eagle of Jove. Can anyone believe that Jove felt passion for a boy? Explain how the aged poet of Maeonia came to imagine such a thing. It is the man who finds satisfaction in the counsel, wisdom and joys of God who is thought to be caught up into the presence of mighty Jove.

Notes:

1. In later editions the adjective is applied to the painter rather than Ganymede.

2. ‘The Trojan boy’, i.e. Ganymede, son of the Trojan prince, Tros, snatched away by the gods to be Jove’s cup-bearer. See Homer, Iliad 20.232ff, though the eagle is a post-Homeric addition. The Greek motto in the accompanying illustration, gannusthai medesi, means ‘to delight in counsels’, referring to a supposed etymology of the name Ganymedes, for which see Xenophon, Symposium 8.30.

3. ‘The aged poet of Maeonia’, i.e Homer. His place of activity is disputed. Chios or Smyrna is most likely - these are places in the central coastal area of Asia Minor, known as Lydia or Maeonia.


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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E2v p68]

In parasitos.

Professional spongers

XXVI.

Quos tibi donamus fluviales accipe cancros.
Munera conveniunt moribus ista tuis.
His oculi vigiles, & forfice plurimus ordo
Chelarum armatus, maximaque alvus adest.
Sic tibi propensus stat pingui abdomine venter,
Pernicesque pedes, spiculaque apta pedi.
Cm vagus in triviis, mensaeque sedilibus erras,
Inque alios mordax scommata salsa iacis.[1]

Receive these river crabs which we present to you. These gifts match your character. They have watchful eyes, and a great row of claws armed with a pincer, and a huge gut is there. You too have a protruding belly with fat paunch, scuttling feet and sharp weapons on them, as you hang about the crossroads or move among the seats at table, and maliciously shoot your stinging, witty jibes.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E3r p69]

Wider die bauchdiener.

XXVI.

Ich mayn es reym sich wol zu dier,
Das een kreb so ich dier schick,
Der kreb ist ein geschwollen thier,
Und hat vil scher damit er zwick:
Dein stich wort, list, hemische dyck,
Und voller bauch wierd zaygt hiemit:
Auch wendst dein redt all augenblick,
Gleych nach des kreb unsteten tridt.

Notes:

1. Variant reading, scommata falsa, ‘libellous witticisms’


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