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EX ARDUIS perpetuum nomen.

Lasting renown won through tribulation

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [B3r]

Crediderat platani ramis sua pignora passer,
Et bene cum [=ni] saevo visa dracone forent.
Glutiit hic pullos omnes, miseramque parentem
Saxeus, et tali dignus obire nece.
Haec nisi mentitur Calchas monumenta laboris
Sunt longi, cuius fama perennis eat.[1]

A sparrow had entrusted her young to the branches of a plane-tree, and all would have been well, if they had not been observed by a merciless snake. This creature devoured all the chicks and the hapless parent too, a stony-hearted beast, turned to stone as it deserved. Unless Calchas speaks falsely, these are the tokens of long toil, the fame of which will go on through all the years.

Notes:

1. See Homer, Iliad 2.299ff. for this portent which occurred at Aulis, where the Greek fleet was waiting to sail for Troy. Calchas the seer interpreted the eating of the eight chicks and their mother, followed by the death of the snake, as foretelling the nine-year battle for Troy, followed by success.


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  • Industriousness, Assiduity; 'Assiduità', 'Industria', 'Zelo' (Ripa) [54A11] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Difficulty (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54DD4(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Punishment; 'Castigo', 'Pena', 'Punitione' (Ripa) [57BB13] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Fame; 'Fama', 'Fama buona', 'Fama chiara' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [59B32(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • sacrifice to Jupiter and Apollo: a snake swallows a nest of eight young birds and their mother; the augur Calchas explains the portent [94D12] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F1v p82]

Inviolabiles telo Cupidinis.

Immune to Cupid’s dart

XXXIII.

Ne dirus te vincat amor, neu foemina mentem
Diripiat magicis artibus ulla tuam:
Bacchica avis praesto tibi Motacilla paretur,
Quam quadriradiam circuli in orbe loces:
Ore crucem & cauda, & geminis ut complicet alis,[1]
Tale amuletum carminis omnis erit.
Dicitur hoc Veneris signo Pagasaeus Iason
Phasiacis laedi non potuisse dolis.[2]

To prevent merciless love overcoming you, to prevent any woman plundering your mind with magic arts, provide yourself with a wagtail, bird of Bacchus. Place it spread four ways within the sphere of a circle, so that it forms the arms of a cross with its beak, tail and paired wings. Such a thing will be an amulet against all magic spells. Through this figure, the gift of Venus, it is said that Jason of Pagasae became immune to the wiles of Phasis.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F2r p83]

Unverletzlich in der buelschafft.

XXXIII.

Wilt das dier nicht zu schaden kumm
In buelschafft durch weybs zauberey,
Richt crutzwey zsam zwen circkel krumm,
Und das darinn ain bachsteltz sey,
Mit flugle, schnabl, und schwantzle frey
Auch in ain creutz glegt: wie man sagt,
Hat Medeae schwartz kunstlerey
Also der [=den] helt Jason verjagt.

Notes:

1. These lines describe the rhombos, a device used in casting love-spells. The bird usually employed was a wryneck, associated with Bacchus, possibly because of its dappled markings. (Cf. the dappled fawns associated with the god.) The wagtail seems to have been confused with the wryneck in folk belief.

2. Pagasa (or Pagasae) was the place in Thessaly where the ship Argo was built, in which the Argonauts, led by Jason, sailed to Colchis in the region round the river Phasis to fetch the Golden Fleece. In this and in other tasks imposed on them by the king of Phasis they were helped by the sorceress Medea, daughter of the king. Instructed by Venus, Jason used the rhombos to cause Medea to fall in love with him and so use her spells to help, not harm, him. See Pindar, Pythian Odes 4.216ff.


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