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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Y9r f237r]

Parem delinquentis & suasoris culpam esse.

The one who urges wrongdoing is as guilty as the one who does the wrong

Emblema clxxiii.

Praeconem lituo perflantem classica, victrix
Captivum in tetro carcere turba[1] tenet.
Queis ille excusat, quòd nec sit strenuus armis,
Ullius aut saevo laeserit ense latus.
Huic illi: Quin ipse magis timidissime peccas,
Qui clangore alios aeris in arma cies.[2]

The victorious host holds captive in a foul dungeon a herald, who sounds military commands on his trumpet. To them he makes his excuses - he is no strong fighting man and has wounded no one's side with a cruel sword. They reply: You abject coward, you are in fact more guilty, for you with the sound of your trumpet stir up others to fight.

EX Aesopo, de tubicine in bello capto: quod ex
Iurisconsultorum placitis intelligitur, nempe
qui agunt, & qui assensum praebent pari poena pu-
mendos. Quod tamen malim in eos torqueri specia-
lius, qui malo consilio Principes ad bella concitant.
eó nocentiores iis qui re ipsa caedem faciunt.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [Y9v v237v]

Autant coulpable est celuy qui conseille,
que celuy qui execute.

EN une grande desfaitte,
Pendant le choc, un trompette
Fut prins par les ennemis:
Il pensoit avoir franchise:
Mais sur luy ont la main mise,
Et puis en prison l’ont mis.
Luy usoit de ceste excuse,
D’armes & cousteaux je n’use:
Eux le payerent content,
Bien, tu n’as tué personne:
Mais quand ta trompette sonne,
Mon amy, c’est bien autant.

CEcy est d’Esope, du Trompette prins
prisonnier en guerre: de mesme appre-
nons-nous des Jurisconsultes, que ceux qui font
& qui consentent, sont punis de mesme peine
. Ce
que toutesfois j’aymeroie mieux employer
contre ceux particulierement, qui par mau-
vais conseil incitent les Princes à la guerre,
lesquels hommes sont beaucoup plus dange-
reux que ceux qui tuent de faict.

Notes:

1.  Variant reading in 1550, turma ‘troop’

2.  This is a version of Aesop, Fables 325.


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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H6v p124]

A minimis quoque timendum.[1]

Beware of even the weakest foe

LIIII.

Bella gerit Scarabaeus & hostem provocat ultrò,
Robore & inferior, consilio superat.
Nam plumis Aquilae clàm se neque cognitus abdit,
Hostilem ut nidum summa per astra petat:
Ovaque confodiens, prohibet spem crescere prolis:
Hocque modo illatum dedecus ultus abit.[2]

The scarab beetle is waging war and takes the challenge to its foe. Though inferior in physical strength, it is superior in strategy. It hides itself secretly in the eagle’s feathers without being felt, in order to attack its enemy’s nest across the lofty skies. It bores into the eggs and prevents the hoped-for offspring from developing. And then it departs, having thus avenged the insult inflicted on it.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [H7r p125]

Man solle ihm auch vor den we-
nigsten furchten.

LIIII.

Vor zeiten wie Esopus schreybt,
Der Schroter mit dem Adler strit,
Dem er sich in das gfider kleybt
Heimlich, und kam gefaren mit
Ins Adlers nest, dem er on bit
Gar listig all sein ayer brach:
Drumb halt mit groß und klaynen frid,
Zu schwach ist niemand zu der rach.

Notes:

1.  Before the 1536 edition, Wechel editions used an earlier version of the woodcut in which the beetle had no horns.

2.  For the feud between the eagle and the beetle, see Aesop, Fables 4; Erasmus, Adagia 2601, Scarabaeus aquilam quaerit.


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