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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E8r p79]

Que las cosas muy firmes no se pueden
arrancar.

Ottava rhima.

Aun qu’el Oceano se embravezca tanto
Que d’el furor rebiente conçevido
Haziendo con braveza a’l mundo espanto,
Y de ti sea Turco el Rhin[1] sorbido
No pasaras de raya el pie, por quanto
Tiempo traxere campo el invençido
Carlos,[2] que como enzina no se muda  [M]
Aunque la foja el viento la sacuda.

[Marginalia - link to text]Carlos Quinto. Emperador

Notes:

1.  The Spanish implies that the Turks were threatening the Rhine. The Turks invaded along the Danube and reached Hungary, winning the battle of Mohacs in 1526. When Alciato was writing, they continued to threaten Vienna and Central Europe.

2.  Emperor Charles V led the campaign to recover the lost territory.


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  • Asiatic races and peoples: Turks [32B33(TURKS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Constancy, Tenacity; 'Costanza', 'Tenacità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A21(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Stability, Firmness; 'Fermezza', 'Stabilimento', 'Stabilità' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [53A22(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Invincibility (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A71(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • historical person (with NAME) other representations to which the NAME of a historical person may be attached (with NAME of person) [61B2(CHARLES V [of Holy Roman Empire])3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • geographical names of countries, regions, mountains, rivers, etc. (names of cities and villages excepted) (with NAME) [61D(RHINE)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Oceanus [91B112] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Single Emblem View

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I1v p130]

Cum larvis non luctandum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

LVII.

Aeacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3],
Qui toties hosteis vicerat antè suos,
Comprimere haud potuit vocem insultantibus illis,
Dum curru & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est: sic cassi luce leonis
Convellunt barbam vel timidi lepores.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [I2r p131]

Mit todten ist nit zu fechten.

LVII.

Hector der sighafft toedlich wund
Durch seines feinds Achillis hand,
Sagt noch zu letst aus freyem mund,
Als im anlegten spoetlich band
Die Griechen: Volbringt ewern thand
Nach lust, in zager hasen art,
Die umb ein todten Lewen standt,
Zopffen im hie und dort den part.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’. Textual variant: Aeacidae.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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