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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[I7v p142]

Nec quaestioni quidem cedendum.

Do not yield even to torture

LXIII.

Cecropia effictam quam cernis in arce Leaenam,
Harmodii, an nescis hospes? amica fuit.
Sic animum placuit monstrare viraginis acrem
More ferae, nomen vel quia tale tulit.
Qu˛d fidibus contorta suo non prodidit ullum
Indicio, elinguem reddidit Iphicrates.[1]

This lioness that you see represented on the Athenian citadel was Harmodius’s lover - stranger, you must know the story. This was how they decided to proclaim the brave woman’s fierce spirit, by representing her as a lioness. Besides, her name was Lioness too. Tortured on the rack, she betrayed no-one by her evidence, and so Iphicrates represented the beast without a tongue.

Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[I8r p143]

In peinlicher frag nicht bekennen.

LXIII.

Imm schloss zu Athen stet gemalt
Die gmeyn fraw Leaena genant,
In einr zunglosen Lewin gstalt,
Drumb das sy wie ein stehlein wandt
Der strengen frag thet widerstand,
Und den tyrannen niembt verschwetzt:
Ist also irem nam verwand,
Zu sonderm lob di▀ bild gesetzt.

Notes:

1. áHarmodius and Aristogeiton conspired to kill Hipparchus, the brother of the Athenian tyrant Hippias. Harmodius was killed, Aristogeiton arrested and tortured. Also tortured was Leaena (‘Lioness’) a courtesan, beloved of Harmodius, as she too was suspected of being in the conspiracy. She however revealed nothing. After the fall of Hippias, the two men were treated as tyrannicides and bronze statues were erected in their honour (509 BC). To avoid appearing to honour a courtesan, the Athenians had Leaena represented by Iphicrates (or Amphicrates) as a lioness without a tongue, indicating both her name and the reason for remembering her. See Pliny, Natural History 34.19.72; Plutarch, De garrulitate 505E.


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  • tongue [31A22141] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • torture [44G330] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Taciturnity; 'Secretezza', 'Secretezza overo TaciturnitÓ' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [52DD3(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Courage, Bravery, Valiance, Manliness; 'Ardire magnanimo et generoso', 'Gagliardezza', 'Valore', 'Virt¨ heroica', 'Virt¨ dell'animo e del corpo' (Ripa) [54A8] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • names of cities and villages (with NAME) [61E(ATHENS)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • (story of) Harmodius and Aristogiton representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(HARMODIUS & ARISTOGITON)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • male persons from classical history (with NAME) representations to which the NAME of a person from classical history may be attached [98B(IPHICRATES)3] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • female persons from classical history (with NAME) suffering, misfortune of person from classical history [98C(LAENA)6] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[I6v p140]

Quod non capit Christus, rapit fiscus.

What Christ does not receive, the exchequer seizes

LXII.

Exprimit humentes quas iam madefecerat antŔ
Spongiolas, cupidi Principis arcta manus.
Provehit ad summum fures quos deinde coŰrcet,
Vertat ut in fiscum quae malŔ parta suum.[1]

The dripping sponges which he had previously filled with moisture the tight hand of a greedy prince is wringing out. He advances thieves to the top and then puts pressure on them, so that he may divert to his own treasury their ill-gotten gains.

Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[I7r p141]

Unrecht gewunnen guet
gedeyet nit.

LXII.

Ein schwam macht man drumb na▀ und feycht,
Das man in gleich druck wider au▀:
Ein geitig Furst die aempter leycht
Nur den die tragen in yer hau▀,
Die stelen, rawben nach der pau▀:
Und bald sy wol besackt mit guet,
Fuert er sy in einn solchen strau▀,
Der sy zu gleich kost guet und pluet.

Notes:

1. áThis is based on Suetonius, Life of the Deified Vespasian 16.


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