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Nil reliqui.

Nothing left

Scilicet hoc deerat, post tot mala denique nostris
Locustae ut raperent, quidquid inesset, agris.[1]
Vidimus innumeras euro[2] duce tendere turmas,
Qualia non Atylae castrave Xerxis erant.[3]
Hae foenum, milium, corda omnia consumpserunt;
Spes & in angusto est, stant nisi vota super.

This was all it needed - that after so many misfortunes, finally locusts should seize whatever was in our fields. We have seen countless squadrons encamped, led by Eurus, hosts such as Attila and Xerxes never had. These creatures have eaten up all hay, millet and later crops. There is little scope for hope unless our prayers prevail.

Notes:

1.  Referring to a plague of locusts in North Italy in 1541/2 .

2.  Eurus was the wind from the East.

3.  Attila the Hun and Xerxes, King of Persia, were leaders who invaded the Roman Empire and Greece with vast armies in mid fifth century AD and 480 BC respectively. Xerxes’ invasion and Attila’s first invasion both came from the east.


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Ars naturam adiuvans.

Art assisting nature

Ut Fortuna pilae,[1] cubo sic insidet Hermes:
Artibus hic, variis casibus illa praeest.
Adversus vim Fortunae est ars facta:[2] sed artis
Cum Fortuna mala est, saepe requirit opem
Disce bonas artes igitur studiosa iuventus,
Quae certae secum commoda sortis habent.

As Fortune rests on a sphere, so Hermes sits on a cube. He presides over the arts, she over the varied chances of life. Art was developed to counteract the effect of Fortune, but when Fortune is bad it often needs the assistance of Art. Therefore, studious youths, learn good arts, which bring with them the benefits of an outcome not subject to chance.

Notes:

1.  Variant reading, Ut spherae Fortuna, with the same meaning.

2.  Variant reading, Adversus vim Fortunae est ars tuta, ‘Art is safe against the power of Fortune’.


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