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POTENTIA AMORIS.

The power of Love

Nudus amor viden ut ridet placidumque tuetur?
Nec faculas nec quae cornua flectat habet.[1]
Altera sed manuum flores gerit altera piscem,
Scilicet & terrae iura dat atque mari.[2]

Do you see how Love, all naked, smiles, do you see his gentle glance? He has no torches, nor a bow to bend, but in one of his hands he holds flowers, in the other a fish, and he imposes his rule, of course, on land and sea.

Notes:

1. áThese were traditional attributes of Cupid (Love). See [A31a080] and [A31a096]. The blindfold, although a traditional attribute of Cupid, is inappropriate here.

2. áLater editions read Scilicet ut terrae iura det atque mari.


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  • 'Terra', 'Carro della terra' (Ripa) [21B0] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • 'Acqua', 'Carro dell'acqua' (Ripa) [21D0] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • Strength, Power; 'Fortezza', 'Fortezza d'Animo e di corpo', 'Fortezza del corpo congiunta con la generositÓ dell'animo', 'Fortezza & valore del corpo congiunto con la prudenza & virt¨ del animo', 'Forza' (Ripa) (+ emblematical representation of concept) [54A7(+4):56F2(+4)] Search | Browse Iconclass
  • 'Forza d'amore, Forza d'amore si nell'acqua come in terra' (Ripa) [56F2515] Search | Browse Iconclass

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Link to an image of this pageá Link to an image of this page á[G3r p101]

Que el que en mal anda en tal acaba.

Ottava rhima.

Llevava Ó un escorpion un cuervo assido,
Don conveniente a su gula atrevida,
Porque de su mortal veneno herido
(Como lo mereši˛) perdi˛ la vida.
O caso digno de ser bien reido,
Que con la muerte que estÓ aperšebida
Para otro, muere aquel quela apercibe,
Y por su proprio mal mas mal recibe.[1]

Notes:

1. áThis is based on Anthologia graeca 9.339. See Erasmus, Adagia 58, Cornix scorpium, where the Greek epigram is again translated.


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