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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [n8v p208]

Superbia.

Pride

LXII.

En statuae statua,[1] & ductum de marmore marmor
Se conferre deis ausa procax Niobe. [2]
Est vitium muliebre superbia, & arguit oris
Duritiem, ac sensus, qualis inest lapidi.

Behold a statue of a statue, marble carved from marble, insolent Niobe, who dared to set herself up against the gods. Pride is a woman’s vice, and shows hardness of face and feeling, such as exists in a stone.

Notes:

1.  According to the best-known story of her fate, Niobe was turned to stone. For the statue of Niobe by Praxiteles, see Ausonius, Epigrams, 63.2 and Anthologia Graeca, 16.130, a much translated epigram, which seems to have been in Alciato’s thoughts here.

2.  Niobe in her pride boasted that having 12 (or 14) children, she was superior to Lato with just two, i.e. Apollo and Diana. These gods in revenge slew all her children and in her grief Niobe hardened into a rock; see Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.165ff. See further, Erasmus, Adagia, 2233, ‘Niobes mala’.


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    Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [O5r p217]

    La luxuria.

    SEMIOTTAVA.[1]

    El Fauno con la oruga coronado
    Da seņal de luxuria y de su llama,
    Que en el cabron y oruga[2] esto es notado,
    Y el Satyro ā las Nymphas sigue y ama.[3]

    Notes:

    1.  The woodcut used here is also used in ‘La fuerza de la naturaleza’ [[A49a189]], but not that found in three emblems in the French editions of 1549. See [FALb066], [FALb091] and [FALb115].

    2.  Oruga = rocket: described as herba salax in Ovid, Ars amatoria, 4.22. Pliny, Natural History, 10.83.182 and 19.44.154, lists it as an aphrodisiac.

    3.  Satyrs were creatures half-human, half-goat in form, like Faunus, and Pan with whom Faunus was often identified. See emblems 189 ([A49a189]), and 105 ([A49a105]). Cf. Horace, Odes, 3.18.1: ‘Faunus, you who lust after the fleeing nymphs’.


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