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EMBLEMA CLXXVIII [=177] .

Maledicentia.

Evil speaking

Archilochi[1] tumulo insculptas de marmore vespas
Esse ferunt,[2] linguae certa sigilla malae.

They say that on the tomb of Archilochus wasps were carved in marble, sure figures of an evil tongue.

Das CLXXVIII [=177] .

Ubelreden.

Es solln auffs Archilochs Grabstein
Wie man sagt Wespen ghauwen seyn
Sie seind ein gwi zeichn und urkundt
Eins bsen Mauls und herben Mundt.

Notes:

1. Archilochus was an eighth-century BC poet, author of much (now fragmentary) verse, including satire. This last was considered in antiquity to be excessively abusive and violent. See Horace, Ars Poetica, 79; also Erasmus, Adagia, 60 (Irritare crabrones).

2. ferunt, ‘they say’: words suggested by Anthologia Graeca, 7.71, an epigram concerning the tomb of Archilochus.


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    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [O8v p224]

    La clemencia d’el Principe.

    SONETO.

    D’el Rey de abejas se affirma y escrive
    Que por que herir no pueda est privado
    D’el aguijon,[1] con quien su pueblo armado
    Contrasta a’l enemigo y se apercibe.
    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [P1r p225] Ansi de sus abejas bien recibe,
    Ansi le guardan siempre en el estado
    Donde de la Fortuna fue encumbrado
    Porque sin hazer mal govierna y bive.
    O Reyes que subis bien tamao
    O por Fortuna, por merecimiento,
    Sabed con no hazer mal no hazeros dao!
    Mirad que basta el pueblo estar contento
    Para libraros de qualquier engao,
    Y para os encumbrar en todo aumento.

    Notes:

    1. According to Pliny, Natural History, 11.21.74, wasps do not have ‘kings’: it is the ‘mother’ wasps that are without stings. On the other hand, the ‘king’ bee (the ancients believed the queen bee to be male) and its lack of sting, or refusal to use its sting, was often mentioned; e.g. Aelian, De natura animalium, 5.10; Pliny, ibid., 17.52. For the analogy with kingship, see e.g. Seneca, De Clementia, 1.19; Erasmus, Adagia, 2601 (Scarabaeus aquilam quaerit).


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