Single Emblem View

Section: STULTITIA (Folly). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E3v p70]

Aliud.[1]

Another on the bat.

Vespere quae tantm volitat, quae lumine lusca est,
Quae cm alas gestet, caetera muris habet,
Ad res diversas trahitur. mala nomina primm
Signat: quae latitant iudiciumque timent.
Inde & philosophos, qui dum coelestia quaerunt,
Caligant oculis, falsaque sola vident.
Tandem & versutos, cm clm sectentur utrumque,
Acquirunt neutra qui sibi parte fidem.

The creature that flies only in the evening, that has poor sight, that is endowed with wings, but has other features belonging to a mouse, is used to represent various things. First it indicates persons of bad standing who lie low and fear being called to account. Next philosophers, who, while they search the heavens, develop blurred vision and only see what is false. Lastly, wily men, who secretly court both parties, but do not win trust on either side.

Notes:

1. This is the same image as Emblem 61.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

Single Emblem View

Section: STULTITIA (Folly). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E2v p68]

Cuculi.

Cuckoos

Ruricolas, agreste genus, plerique cuculos
Cur vocitent, quaenam prodita causa fuit?[1]
Vere novo cantat Coccyx, quo tempore vites
Qui non absolvit, iure notatur[2] iners.
Fert ova in nidos alienos, qualiter ille
Cui thalamum prodit uxor adulterio.

Whatever explanation has been given for the custom of calling country-dwellers, that rustic race, ‘cuckoos’? - When spring is new, the cuckoo calls, and anyone who has not pruned his vines by this time is rightly blamed for being idle. The cuckoo desposits its eggs in other birds’ nests, like the man on whose account a wife betrays her marriage bed in adultery.

Notes:

1. See Pliny, Natural History, 18.66.249, and Horace, Satires, 1.7.31, for the use of the word ‘cuckoo’ as term of mockery for the idle man who has failed to finish pruning his vines before the cuckoo is heard calling.

2. In some editions, vocatur for notatur.


Related Emblems

Show related emblems Show related emblems

Hint: You can set whether related emblems are displayed by default on the preferences page


Iconclass Keywords

Relating to the image:

Relating to the text:

Hint: You can turn translations and name underlining on or off using the preferences page.

 

Back to top

Privacy notice
Terms and conditions