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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [Q4r p247]

Cherephon.

XCI.

D’une chauvesouris Cherephon print le nom:
Car pour estudier il veilloit sans cesser.
Sa face s’enfuma, sa voix vint crisser,
Parquoy tresjustement il acquit tel surnom.[1]

Commentaires.

Cerephon Athenien, disciple de Socrates, s’opi-
niastra tellement estudier, qu’estant estrangement
affoibli par ses veilles nocturnes, il en devint pasle &
maigre extremement: si que par gausserie on l’appe-
loit choutte ou chauvesouris. S’appliquer sans cesse
l’estude des arts liberaux, fait devenir maigre: La
maigreur sans doute, diminue la voix: la suye des
lampes rend la face noire & enfumee.

Notes:

1. Chaerophon, a distinguished disciple of Socrates, was nick-named ‘The Bat’ and ‘Boxwood’ for his pale complexion and poor health, supposedly brought on by excessive study. See Aristophanes, Aves, 1564; Philostratus, Vitae sophistarum, 1.482.


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    Section: STULTITIA (Folly). View all emblems in this section.

    Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E2v p68]

    Cuculi.

    Cuckoos

    Ruricolas, agreste genus, plerique cuculos
    Cur vocitent, quaenam prodita causa fuit?[1]
    Vere novo cantat Coccyx, quo tempore vites
    Qui non absolvit, iure notatur[2] iners.
    Fert ova in nidos alienos, qualiter ille
    Cui thalamum prodit uxor adulterio.

    Whatever explanation has been given for the custom of calling country-dwellers, that rustic race, ‘cuckoos’? - When spring is new, the cuckoo calls, and anyone who has not pruned his vines by this time is rightly blamed for being idle. The cuckoo desposits its eggs in other birds’ nests, like the man on whose account a wife betrays her marriage bed in adultery.

    Notes:

    1. See Pliny, Natural History, 18.66.249, and Horace, Satires, 1.7.31, for the use of the word ‘cuckoo’ as term of mockery for the idle man who has failed to finish pruning his vines before the cuckoo is heard calling.

    2. In some editions, vocatur for notatur.


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