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Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [F4r p87]

Sur celluy qui procure mal soymesme.

PROSOPOPOEIE.

A grand regret je Chievre ung loup allaicte
Mais mon pasteur le nourrir se delecte,[1]
Quand creu sera, il fauldra qu’il me mange:
Par nul bienfaict mauvaistie ne se change.[2]

Plusieurs nourrissent ceulx, par les-
quelz ilz seront destruictz.

Notes:

1. This is a translation of Anthologia graeca 9.47. For the content cf. Aesop, Fables 313-5.

2. ‘Wickedness is never deterred by services rendered’. See Erasmus, Adagia 1086, Ale luporum catulos.


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Section: STULTITIA (Folly). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page Link to an image of this page [E4r p71]

Ira.

Rage.

Alcaeam veteres caudam dixre Leonis,
Qua stimulante iras concipit ille graves.
Lutea cm surgit bilis, crudescit & atro
Felle dolor, furias excitat indomitas.[1]

The ancients called the lion’s tail alcaea, for under its stimulus he takes on dreadful fury. When the yellow bile rises and his temper grows savage with the black gall, the tail incites his indomitable rage.

Notes:

1. The Greek word ἀλκαία was supposedly derived from ἀλκή ‘strength’ (see Emblem 3, n.3, [A50a003]). The Etymologicum Magnum, an ancient Greek lexicon, defines ἀλκαία as ‘properly the tail of the lion, because it urges him on to strength (ἀλκή)’. Pliny, Natural History, 8.16.49, describes how the lion’s tail lashes with increasing fury and spurs him on. See also Aelian, De natura animalium, 5.39.


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