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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [E4r p71]

In receptatores sicariorum.

Those who harbour cut-throats

EMBLEMA LII.

Latronum, furumque manus tibi, Scaeva[1], per urbem
It comes, & diris cincta cohors gladiis:
Atque ita te mentis generosum prodige censes,
Quòd tua complures allicit olla malos.
En novus Actaeon, qui postquàm cornua sumpsit,
In praedam canibus se dedit ipse suis.[2]

An evil-minded band of ruffians and thieves accompanies you about the city, a gang of supporters armed with lethal swords. And so, you wastrel, you consider yourself a fine lordly fellow because your cooking pot draws in crowds of scoundrels. - Here’s a fresh Actaeon - he, after he grew his horns, became the prey of his own hunting dogs.

Notes:

1.  Scaeva, ‘evil-minded’. The capital letter suggests that the Latin word could be taken as a proper name in the vocative case, i.e addressing one Scaeva.

2.  For the story of Actaeon turned into a stag and killed by his own hounds, see Ovid, Metamorphoses 3.138ff. Similarly, the hangers-on will destroy the one who has fed them.


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Section: PERFIDIA (Treachery). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [D4v p56]

VITIA.

Vices

In victoriam dolo partam.

On victory won by guile

Aiacis tumulum lachrymis ego perluo virtus.
Heu misera albentes dilacerata comas.
Scilicet hoc, restabat adhuc, ut iudice Graeco[1]
Vincerer: & causa stet potiore dolus.[2]

I, Virtue, bedew with tears the tomb of Ajax, tearing, alas, in my grief my whitening hairs. This was all it needed - that I should be worsted with a Greek as judge, and that guile should appear to have the better cause.

Notes:

1.  The Greek assembly awarded the arms of the dead Achilles to the cunning and eloquent Ulysses, not the brave and straight-forward Ajax. For Ajax’ subsequent suicide, see [A51a028].

2.  See Anthologia graeca 7.145.


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