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Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M6v p188]

Par argent quelque fois fault
racheter sa vie.

Apostrophe.

Le Bievre gros en ventre, & en pied lasche
Se saulve, ainsi quand sur luy chiens on lasche:
Ses medicaulx coillons arrache, & mord,
Sachant pour eulx estre cherché à mort.
Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [M7r p189] Par tel exemple appren à n’espargner
Perdre l’argent, pour la vie gaigner.[1]

A l’exemple du Bievre (dict Ca-
stor,) qui ses coillons arrachéz à ses
propres dents, laisse au veneur, &
aulx chiens, pour sauver le corps:
Nous sommes admonnestez de n’e-
spargner en cas de necessité toutz
biens de Fortune, & Nature, dond
on se puisse passer pour saulver le
principal, qu’est la vie.

Notes:

1.  This is based on Aesop, Fables 153, where the same moral is drawn. For the information about the beaver, see Pliny, Natural History 8.47.109; Isidore, Etymologiae (Origines) 12.2.21.


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Section: MORS (Death). View all emblems in this section.

Link to an image of this page  Link to an image of this page  [L3v p166]

Cum larvis non luctandum.[1]

Do not wrestle with the dead

Aeacidae[2] moriens percussu cuspidis Hector[3]:,
Qui toties hosteis vicerat antè suos:
Comprimere haud potuit vocem, insultantibus illis,
Dum curru, & pedibus nectere vincla parant.
Distrahite ut libitum est: sic cassi luce leonis
Convellunt barbam vel timidi lepôres.[4]

When he was dying from the wound dealt by the spear of Aeacus’ descendant, Hector, who had so often before defeated his own enemies, could not keep silent as they triumphed over him, while preparing to tie the ropes to chariot and feet. Tear me as you will, he said; when the lion is deprived of the light of life, even cowardly hares pluck his beard.

Notes:

1.  Cf. Erasmus, Adagia 153, Cum larvis luctari.

2.  ‘of Aeacus’ descendant’, i.e. ‘of Achilles’.

3.  Hector was the greatest warrior on the Trojan side in the Trojan War, killed in single combat by Achilles, the Greek champion. See Homer, Iliad 22.367ff. and 24.14ff. for Achilles’ desecration of Hector’s body, dragging it, tied by the feet behind his chariot, round the tomb of Patroclus.

4.  The last two lines are a translation of the two-line epigram Anthologia graeca 16.4, where, in Planudes’ text, the words are attributed to Hector in the heading.


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